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Part II - Zooming in on ELF

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  17 December 2020

Anna Mauranen
Affiliation:
University of Helsinki
Svetlana Vetchinnikova
Affiliation:
University of Helsinki
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Chapter
Information
Language Change
The Impact of English as a Lingua Franca
, pp. 175 - 355
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2020

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