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Part I - Pooling Perspectives

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  17 December 2020

Anna Mauranen
Affiliation:
University of Helsinki
Svetlana Vetchinnikova
Affiliation:
University of Helsinki
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Language Change
The Impact of English as a Lingua Franca
, pp. 11 - 174
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2020

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