Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-544b6db54f-dkqnh Total loading time: 0.551 Render date: 2021-10-23T14:14:29.845Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Introduction

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  17 December 2020

Anna Mauranen
Affiliation:
University of Helsinki
Svetlana Vetchinnikova
Affiliation:
University of Helsinki
Get access

Summary

Languages undergo continual change, but not at constant speed. External and internal dynamics affect the speed as well as the different scales at which change occurs. Among important external factors, societal change, mobility and the ensuing language contact create conditions of stability or instability and upheaval. Language-internal changes may be triggered off by external changes, for instance when these lead to lively contact between languages or varieties, but internal changes may also begin seemingly autonomously, and may affect different subsystems, or one or more subsystems at different stages. In this volume both internal and external processes of language change are addressed, with a focus on contemporary processes and on English, although not exclusively, so that historical lines of development are included, as are other languages. Throughout the volume, the contributions highlight social contexts of various sizes and kinds, and social processes interacting with linguistic ones. A few chapters also delve into cognitive processes and individual users, thus ensuring that a range of scales is covered in addressing the issues of change and the specific phenomenon of English as a global lingua franca.

Type
Chapter
Information
Language Change
The Impact of English as a Lingua Franca
, pp. 1 - 10
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2020

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Franzmann, Andreas, Jansen, Axel & Münte, Peter. 2015. Legitimizing science: Introductory essay. In Jansen, Axel, Franzmann, Andreas & Münte, Peter (eds.), Legitimizing Science: National and Global Publics (1800–2010), 1134. Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
Jenkins, Jennifer. 2015. Repositioning English and multilingualism in English as a Lingua Franca. Englishes in Practice 2(3), 4985.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Mauranen, Anna. 2018. Second language acquisition, World Englishes, and English as a Lingua Franca (ELF). World Englishes 37, 106119.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Mortensen, Janus. 2017. Transient multilingual communities as a field of investigation: Challenges and opportunities. Journal of Linguistic Anthropology 27(3), 271288.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Pavlenko, Aneta. 2014. The Bilingual Mind. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Ross, Malcolm. 2003. Diagnosing prehistoric language contact. In Hickey, Raymond (ed.), Motives for Language Change, 174198. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Seidlhofer, Barbara. 2011. Understanding English as a Lingua Franca. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Silva-Corvalan, Carmen. 1998. On borrowing as a mechanism of syntactic change. In Schwegler, Armin, Tranel, Bernard & Uribe- Etcxebarria, Myriam (eds.), Romance Linguistics: Theoretical Perspectives, 225246. Amsterdam: John Benjamins.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Wenger, Etienne. 1998. Communities of Practice. Learning, Meaning, and Identity. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Send book to Kindle

To send this book to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Send book to Dropbox

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×