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17 - Reflections on Aptitude

Theory, Research, and Measurement

from Part V - Final Commentaries

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  27 May 2023

Zhisheng (Edward) Wen
Affiliation:
Hong Kong Shue Yan University
Peter Skehan
Affiliation:
Institute of Education, University of London
Richard L. Sparks
Affiliation:
Mount St Joseph University
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Summary

The present volume has explored a very wide range of topics within the field of foreign language aptitude with sections covering aptitude test batteries, the testing of diverse groups, innovative perspectives, and pedagogic implications. Each chapter has made a considerable contribution to updating the topic of aptitude. Inevitably, though, the chapters have explored areas that transcend the different heading sections, making new connections and even announcing new areas for aptitude research. The present chapter highlights all of these insights and weaves them into the discussion of a series of themes which emerge, some traditional from established aptitude work and some reflecting the changes we have seen in recent years.

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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2023

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