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Introduction

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  24 February 2020

Sofie Møller
Affiliation:
Goethe-Universität Frankfurt Am Main
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Summary

Kant illustrates the Critique of Pure Reason with an intricate collection of legal images; the whole work is populated with laws, judges, lawyers, tribunals, legislators, witnesses and many other references to legal theory and practice. Both the critique of pure reason and reason as such are described as legislator, judge and tribunal. In the A edition’s preface, we learn that the task of a critique of reason is to institute a tribunal which is ‘none other than the critique of pure reason itself’ (A xii). In order to function as a court of justice, the critique of pure reason must also act ‘as wise legislators do’ (A 424/B 452) and revise proposed laws when they lead to contradictory judgements. Our approach to nature must be ‘like an appointed judge who compels witnesses to answer the questions he puts to them’ (B xiii). The critique of pure reason thus investigates whether reason can legislate and judge legitimately.

Type
Chapter
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Kant's Tribunal of Reason
Legal Metaphor and Normativity in the <I>Critique of Pure Reason</I>
, pp. 1 - 15
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2020

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  • Introduction
  • Sofie Møller, Goethe-Universität Frankfurt Am Main
  • Book: Kant's Tribunal of Reason
  • Online publication: 24 February 2020
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108682480.001
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  • Introduction
  • Sofie Møller, Goethe-Universität Frankfurt Am Main
  • Book: Kant's Tribunal of Reason
  • Online publication: 24 February 2020
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108682480.001
Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

  • Introduction
  • Sofie Møller, Goethe-Universität Frankfurt Am Main
  • Book: Kant's Tribunal of Reason
  • Online publication: 24 February 2020
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108682480.001
Available formats
×