Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-99c86f546-7mfl8 Total loading time: 0.474 Render date: 2021-11-29T19:11:02.441Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

4 - Kant’s Dialogue with Rousseau Supplemented by His Dreams of a Spirit-Seer

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  19 December 2019

Henry E. Allison
Affiliation:
University of California, San Diego
Get access

Summary

According to Josef Schmucker, the collection of jottings that has become known as Remarks in the Observations on the Feeling of the Beautiful and Sublime because of their location rather than their content constitutes a virtual dialogue with Rousseau, which Schmucker also described as beginning a second stage in the development of Kant’s ethical thought.1 Although this is not the only source for Kant’s views regarding Rousseau in the mid-1760s, since there were significant discussions of the latter’s views in both his Announcement and Herder’s transcript of his ethics lectures, it is indisputably the most important. Kant discusses a large number of topics in Remarks, not all of which involve Rousseau.2 Its central concern, however, is with the relation between humanity in its natural and social conditions and moral theory, broadly construed, which is to say moral anthropology, the importance of which Kant had affirmed in his near contemporaneous and previously discussed Announcement. But while it will be necessary to consider what additional light Remarks sheds, by way of Rousseau, on this broad topic, our main focus will be on its contribution to the understanding of Kant’s views on free will at the time and the influence of Rousseau on these views.

Type
Chapter
Information
Kant's Conception of Freedom
A Developmental and Critical Analysis
, pp. 125 - 175
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2020

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Send book to Kindle

To send this book to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Send book to Dropbox

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×