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3 - Social Property Relations

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 October 2020

Maïa Pal
Affiliation:
Oxford Brookes University
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Summary

Chapter 3 focuses on the social property relations of each case building on the Political Marxist tradition and by engaging with international legal history. This chapter presents the major institutions, actors, and jurisdictional disputes that provide bases to understand, first, the local specificities of the Castilian kingdom and its American colonies, emphasising the broader Iberian fragmented assemblage and the role of theologians in the particular politico-religious form of empire linked to principles of morality and law. In France, the focus is on Louis XIV and his ministers trying to contain the various jurisdictional regimes and conceptions of space, as well as legal actors and orders. The role of England’s social property relations is discussed in relation to the common law and to enclosures in primitive accumulation and the transition to capitalism. Finally, the Dutch Republic highlights the problem of transition and the specific jurisdictional context of its confederation, as well as the role of merchants and magistrates in shaping its politics. The chapter describes practices that could be considered as extensions rather than transports or transplants of authority.

Type
Chapter
Information
Jurisdictional Accumulation
An Early Modern History of Law, Empires, and Capital
, pp. 103 - 158
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2020

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  • Social Property Relations
  • Maïa Pal, Oxford Brookes University
  • Book: Jurisdictional Accumulation
  • Online publication: 15 October 2020
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108684538.004
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  • Social Property Relations
  • Maïa Pal, Oxford Brookes University
  • Book: Jurisdictional Accumulation
  • Online publication: 15 October 2020
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108684538.004
Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

  • Social Property Relations
  • Maïa Pal, Oxford Brookes University
  • Book: Jurisdictional Accumulation
  • Online publication: 15 October 2020
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108684538.004
Available formats
×