Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Hostname: page-component-848d4c4894-8kt4b Total loading time: 0 Render date: 2024-06-14T02:52:33.798Z Has data issue: false hasContentIssue false

8 - The Indenture between Edward III and the Black Prince for the Prince's Expedition to Gascony, 10 July 1355

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 November 2014

Get access

Summary

On 19 September 1356 an English army under the command of Edward of Woodstock (1330–1376), also known as the Black Prince, won a smashing victory over a numerically superior French army led by Jean II (1319–1364). Jean II, of course, was captured. While it was unclear who could claim the honor of actually having done so, what was not in dispute was that Edward III (1312–1377) would ultimately claim the ransom. In fact, this provision was specifically spelled out in the 10 July 1355 indenture between the king and the prince. The prince was free to “have his will” of any prisoners “except only the head [chief] of the war.” In exchange, the prince would receive suitable compensation.

In addition to the ransoms of prisoners the indenture spelled out the prince's and Edward III's responsibilities and obligations. In this, it was like other indentures of the period. The indenture was, essentially, a contract for military service made between the recruiter, e.g., Edward III, and the captain, e.g., the Black Prince. The captain would then subcontract with the men in his retinue and he would pay their wages out of the moneys he had received from the king. The system of indentures, particularly for overseas service – given Edward III's foreign policy, overseas deployment was highly likely – had replaced the feudal levy before the 1350s.

Type
Chapter
Information
Journal of Medieval Military History
Volume XII
, pp. 165 - 172
Publisher: Boydell & Brewer
Print publication year: 2014

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×