Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-684899dbb8-5dd2w Total loading time: 0.266 Render date: 2022-05-17T08:59:24.878Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true }

Gunners, Aides and Archers: The Personnel of the English Ordnance Companies in Normandy in the Fifteenth Century

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 February 2013

Edited by
Get access

Summary

Edward III is widely credited by historians with having presided over a military revolution in English arms; in keeping with this, he was not slow in adapting to technical innovation in the field of war. The English employed guns at Crécy in 1346; and by the time the French war broke out again in 1369 guns were playing an increasingly important role, although mainly at this time in a defensive role in garrisons. The Tower of London was used as an arsenal from which guns were dispatched to English fortresses ranging from Calais to Roxburgh and Berwick. Garrison captains were also authorized to hire guns and gunners themselves on a private enterprise basis. In 1384 Sir Thomas de Beauchamp, the former captain of Carisbrook Castle on the Isle of Wight, was paid £26 5s. by the Crown to reimburse him for the cost of hiring five gunners (canonarii) and their cannons, and another gunner with three cannons. They were hired to defend the island against the French galley fleet which had been cruising the channel. Unfortunately, no details are given of the identity of the gunners or the type of firearms with which they were equipped (though the three guns used by one of these gunners may well have been mounted together on a single multiple carriage of the type known as a ribaudequin). Nor is it recorded for how long they served – and thus what their wages were.

Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Boydell & Brewer
Print publication year: 2011

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×