Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-56f9d74cfd-89lq7 Total loading time: 0.332 Render date: 2022-06-27T19:06:59.730Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true }

3 - The Ivy-mantled Tow'r: Parish and Pastoralia

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  12 September 2012

Colin Haydon
Affiliation:
University of Winchester
Get access

Summary

The Setting

It is unclear whether, in 1778, Williams envisaged spending the rest of his life in south Warwickshire. It is possible that he developed reservations about resubscribing to the Thirty-Nine Articles and that, since resubscription would have been required had he obtained significant preferment, he became content to remain at Wellesbourne. But there is evidence that, as late as 1807, he hoped for a more lucrative and more prestigious living. Nonetheless, he doubtless found Wellesbourne and its locality congenial.

During the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, south Warwickshire became increasingly sophisticated. Its towns prospered and developed leisure facilities; and Williams no doubt appreciated both the various urban amenities and meeting persons of quality in refined and attractive settings. Warwick was only eight miles from Wellesbourne, and had been rebuilt after its disastrous fire of 1694 in a ‘noble and … beautiful … manner’, with wide, well-paved, and well-lit streets. Its surviving medieval buildings, notably the Castle and St Mary's church, contrasted pleasantly with its fine eighteenth-century public buildings and the ‘modern and handsome’ private houses. It further boasted its races, public library, good shops, pleasant inns, and a weekly newspaper; unsurprisingly, it attracted noble and gentry visitors. Still nearer to Wellesbourne was Stratford-upon-Avon, a ‘neat and well-built’ town, with its mixture of ‘curious’ old houses and handsome Georgian architecture, and several good inns, notably the White Lion, the Warwickshire hunt's home in the late eighteenth century.

Type
Chapter
Information
John Henry Williams (1747–1829): 'Political Clergyman'
War, the French Revolution, and the Church of England
, pp. 37 - 62
Publisher: Boydell & Brewer
Print publication year: 2007

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×