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29 - Predestination in Early Modern Thought

from Part IV - The Religious Question

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  14 November 2019

R. Ward Holder
Affiliation:
Saint Anselm College, New Hampshire
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Summary

If there is a theological locus that the popular mind associates with John Calvin, it is the doctrine of predestination, and in particular the notion of “double predestination.” This association is not limited to the popular mind, to be sure; even scholars have attempted to make predestination the “center” of Calvin’s theology. I do not here plan to tackle the issue of the place of predestination in Calvin’s theological framework. My goal instead is to demonstrate the lack of originality of Calvin’s teaching on predestination when placed against the backdrop of both medieval debates surrounding predestination and the theology of Calvin’s fellow reformers.

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John Calvin in Context , pp. 249 - 257
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2019

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References

Choy, Kiven S. K.Calvin’s Reception of Necessitarian Concepts.” In Church and School in Early Modern Protestantism, ed. Ballor, Jordon J. et al. Leiden, The Netherlands: Brill, 2013, 111122.Google Scholar
Kolb, Robert. Bound Choice, Election, and Wittenberg Theological Method: From Martin Luther to the Formula of Concord. Grand Rapids, MI: Eerdmans, 2005.Google Scholar
Muller, Richard. Christ and Decree: Christology and Predestination in Reformed Theology from Calvin to Perkins. Durham, NC: Labyrinth, 1986 (repr. Grand Rapids, MI: Baker Academic, 2008).Google Scholar
Rainbow, Johnathan H. The Will of God and the Cross: An Historical and Theological Study of John Calvin’s Doctrine of Limited Redemption. Allison Park, PA: Pickwick Publications, 1990.Google Scholar
Raith, Charles II. “Calvin’s Critique of Merit, and Why Aquinas (Mostly) Agrees,” Pro Ecclesia 20 (2011): 135153.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

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