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7 - Islam as Resistance

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  16 April 2020

Chiara Formichi
Affiliation:
Cornell University, New York
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Summary

Jihad, a heavily loaded word in the post-9/11 discourse, has in fact many layers, in theological and historical terms. This chapter investigates how the anti-Soviet resistance to the invasion and occupation of Afghanistan in the 1980s turned this Central Asian country into a receptacle of religiously oriented ideologues and militants from all over the world. The social and political transformations of the 1960s and 70s, the conflation of local self-determination, radicalization of refugees, absorption of foreign militants, the charisma of a Palestinian Muslim Brother, and the wealth of a well-connected Saudi man all come together in shaping the Afghan jihad as a symbolic and imagined site of resistance to outside forces for the global umma. If in the 1980s jihad had carried a positive connotation of liberation, in the aftermath to the 9/11 attacks labeling a movement as “jihadist” has become a convenient way for governments to tackle unrest in Muslim areas, even where struggles had been taking place for decades without much connection to Islamist aspirations, as seen in the cases of Southern Philippines, Indonesia, Southern Thailand, Kashmir, and Western China.

Type
Chapter
Information
Islam and Asia
A History
, pp. 206 - 235
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2020

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References

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  • Islam as Resistance
  • Chiara Formichi, Cornell University, New York
  • Book: Islam and Asia
  • Online publication: 16 April 2020
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781316226803.010
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To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

  • Islam as Resistance
  • Chiara Formichi, Cornell University, New York
  • Book: Islam and Asia
  • Online publication: 16 April 2020
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781316226803.010
Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

  • Islam as Resistance
  • Chiara Formichi, Cornell University, New York
  • Book: Islam and Asia
  • Online publication: 16 April 2020
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781316226803.010
Available formats
×