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19 - Health Policy and Population Health in Behavioral Health Care in the United States

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  22 July 2021

Audrey Walker
Affiliation:
Albert Einstein College of Medicine, New York
Steven Schlozman
Affiliation:
Harvard Medical School
Jonathan Alpert
Affiliation:
Albert Einstein College of Medicine, New York
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Summary

The treatment of behavioral health disorders is impacted by the many complexities and challenges inherent in the United States health care system. Patients and their families struggle with limited access, availability and affordability of treatment, inadequate insurance coverage, and a fragmented system of care. To better understand these issues, this chapter provides an overview of the US health care system, with a focus on coverage and financing of behavioral health care; describes current challenges within the system; and highlights emerging solutions to improve behavioral health delivery and outcomes.

Type
Chapter
Information
Introduction to Psychiatry
Preclinical Foundations and Clinical Essentials
, pp. 473 - 485
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2021

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