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8 - Disorders Related to Stress and Trauma

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  22 July 2021

Audrey Walker
Affiliation:
Albert Einstein College of Medicine, New York
Steven Schlozman
Affiliation:
Harvard Medical School
Jonathan Alpert
Affiliation:
Albert Einstein College of Medicine, New York
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Summary

Trauma derives from the Greek τραῦμα, meaning “wound.” Although it has been used for centuries as a medical term to designate “an injury to living tissue caused by an extrinsic agent,” it was not until 1889 that this word endorsed a psychological meaning with the first clinical descriptions of “traumatic neuroses” in victims of railroad accidents by Oppenheim. Stress was first a mechanics term used to describe the pressure or tension exerted on a material object. It was then been applied to mental health to describe a feeling of psychological strain and pressure. Both psychological trauma and stress can result in psychiatric disorders.

Type
Chapter
Information
Introduction to Psychiatry
Preclinical Foundations and Clinical Essentials
, pp. 166 - 178
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2021

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References

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