Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Hostname: page-component-848d4c4894-mwx4w Total loading time: 0 Render date: 2024-06-18T07:16:50.372Z Has data issue: false hasContentIssue false
This chapter is part of a book that is no longer available to purchase from Cambridge Core

8 - Malarial Philosophy: The Modernista Amazonia of Mário de Andrade

Felipe Martínez-Pinzón
Affiliation:
Brown University, Rhode Island
Javier Uriarte
Affiliation:
Stony Brook University, State University of New York
Get access

Summary

Even today the voyages undertaken to the Amazon before the twentieth century and the accounts that the region inspired invite complex discussions about the prospects, impasses, and meanings unique to the construction of civilization in the tropics. Written by both foreign and Brazilian scientists and intellectuals, the records of these travels helped shape persuasive representations that served as points of departure for broader discussions about Brazilian society. These voyages became the setting for an exchange of ideas, interpretations, and impressions about nature, culture, local populations, and the relations between that region of Brazil and the entire nation, and even between Brazil and the rest of the world. And, as such, these travels and their corresponding accounts were of crucial importance to the nation during the first two decades of the twentieth century.

One emblematic case was the Brazilian Commission for the Survey of the Alto Purús [Comissão Brasileira de Reconhecimiento do Alto Purús], led by Euclides da Cunha, and the texts subsequently written by the author about the Amazon, which truly established a representational paradigm. Other accounts were also important during the first two decades of the century, but all of them, directly or indirectly, take into account Cunha's travelogues and texts about the region. Having these important antecedents in mind, and going back to them occasionally, the present essay explores Mário de Andrade's travelogues and literary pieces on the Amazon as they relate to other contemporary foundational texts on Amazonian social thought, namely, the texts that result from Carlos Chagas's incursion as a tropical scientist in this region from 1912 to 1913.

From October 1912 to April 1913, a team sent by the Oswaldo Cruz Institute [Instituto Oswaldo Cruz] and led by Carlos Chagas (1878–1934) surveyed the sanitary conditions of Brazil's main rubber production centers, acting in response to a request from the Rubber Protection Agency. The descriptions and analysis found in the team's report on the voyage draw an image of the Amazon region that was marked by a tension over the category ‘tropical pathology’ and by arguments defending the role that hygiene should play in making the Amazon an integral part of Brazil's civilizing project.3 In the 1920s, modernista authors in Brazil engaged in a debate with these accounts and interpretations.

Type
Chapter
Information
Intimate Frontiers
A Literary Geography of the Amazon
, pp. 150 - 176
Publisher: Liverpool University Press
Print publication year: 2019

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×