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Part II - The Generative/Productive Cold War

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 December 2019

Matthew Craven
Affiliation:
School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London
Sundhya Pahuja
Affiliation:
University of Melbourne
Gerry Simpson
Affiliation:
London School of Economics and Political Science
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Keywords

international lawCold WarUSAUSSRENMODenvironmental modificationcloud seedinginternational humanitarian lawIndochinapoliticspropagandadétentesocio-technical imaginaryinternational lawCold WarUSAUSSRnuclear weaponsco-productionmutual constitutionunipolarmultipolarhegemonyperiodisationsourcestreatiesICJNon-Proliferation TreatyComprehensive Test Ban TreatySecurity Councilinternational lawCold WarUSAUSSRspacedivisionlegal geographyborderstopologyThe City and the CityBerlinKoreaVietnampartitiondecolonisationNon-Alignmentinternational lawCold WarUSAUSSRdata shadowshumintsigintcomintelintTonkin GulfVietnamtechnologyVenonaFive Eyes ArrangementsatellitessurveillanceITUinternational lawCold WarUSAUSSRfreedom of movementthe right to leaveemigrationself-determinationBerlin crisisBerlin WallThird Worldnationalitycitizenshipbrain drainUDHRinternational lawCold WarUSAUSSRGDRdçtenteenvironmentHuxleyUNESCOIUPNevolutionscientific humanismtranshumanismco-operationUNECEStockholm ConferenceOSCEinternational lawCold WarUSAUSSRUN CharterNew World Orderuse of forceAustraliaVietnam Warpublic debatepamphletsGeneva Accordsself-defenceself-determinationSEATOpropagandainternational lawCold WarUSAUSSRhuman rightsenvironmental justiceexceptionalismraceNAACPGlobal SouthMossville v USUN Human Rights CommissionCRCCERDBricker Amendmentinternational lawCold WarUSAUSSRSoviet legal theoryhuman rightsMarxist theoryVyshinskynormativismpositivsminternational lawCold WarUSAUSSRConvention on the Abolition of SlaveryECOSOCILOforced labourpolitics of expertisefreedom and coercioncoloniesdecolonisationinternational lawCold WarUSAUSSRdebteconomic co-operationdçtenteThird Worlddemocratisationeconomic growthdevelopmentNIEOSouth Commissionneo-liberalismstructural adjustment programmesUNCTADinternational lawCold WarUSAUSSRUnited NationslandminesICRCGlobal SouthdisarmamentConventional Weapons ConventionGeneva ConventionsNon-Aligned MovementVietnamBandungAdditional Protocols (1977)human rights
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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2019

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