Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-99c86f546-66nw2 Total loading time: 0.372 Render date: 2021-12-06T10:10:34.437Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Chapter 1 - Introduction

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  09 November 2019

Get access

Summary

RATIONALE FOR AND PURPOSE OF THE BOOK

The policy of tolerance regarding the sale of cannabis (marijuana/hemp/weed, grass and hash) in so-called coffee shops in the Netherlands continues to confront society, the authorities and supporters and opponents of this policy with difficult questions. An important issue is that the cultivation of cannabis to supply coffee shops does not form part of the policy and is therefore completely illegal. This is sometimes referred to as the back-door problem (as deliveries to a coffee shop would take place at the back door). The resulting ambivalent situation around coffee shops leads to much dismay and discussion, including in the Dutch parliament. That discussion is partly about arguments and concrete plans of Dutch municipalities to arrive at regulated cannabis cultivation, as well as initiatives in other countries, which aim to provide such regulation. The discussion led to a promise by the Dutch Minister of Justice and Security to the Parliament to have the recent national and international developments and schemes in the area of cannabis cultivation assessed in the light of international legal frameworks arising from the UN narcotic drugs conventions and from relevant EU law. Until now, the position of the Dutch government on legalizing or regulating in another way the cultivation of cannabis for recreational use has been based on the findings in a report of the T.M.C. Asser Institute from 2005. The conclusion of this report is that under international law there is no room to permit the cultivation of cannabis for the supply of retail shops. The above-mentioned arguments and initiatives from within municipalities and also in other countries were the reason to carry out the further analysis of international law and an assessment based on this law. That is what we do in this research. This does not involve only the above-mentioned problems of supplying coffee shops, but also new developments, such as joint cultivation and consumption in so-called Cannabis Social Clubs.

DEFINITION OF THE CENTRAL PROBLEM

Against the background outlined above, the key question of this research is the following:

To what extent are initiatives regarding the legalization, decriminalization, policy-based tolerance and/or other forms of regulation of cannabis cultivation for recreational use compatible with applicable international law as laid down in the UN narcotic drugs conventions and in European Union law?

Type
Chapter
Information
International Law and Cannabis I
Regulation of Cannabis Cultivation for Recreational Use under the UN Narcotic Drugs Conventions and the EU Legal Instruments in Anti-Drugs Policy
, pp. 1 - 10
Publisher: Intersentia
Print publication year: 2019

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Send book to Kindle

To send this book to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Send book to Dropbox

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×