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Chapter Three - Investigating Individual Differences in Interaction, Feedback, and Task Studies: Aptitude, Working Memory, Cognitive Creativity, and New Findings in L2 Learning

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  03 August 2020

Alison Mackey
Affiliation:
Georgetown University, Washington DC
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Summary

Interaction, feedback, and task researchers often want to know more about the nature of the cognitive processes that occur while language learners are being exposed to second or foreign languages. This applies when learners are hearing (or sometimes reading) or producing language that occurs in interaction and the feedback that results, and often tasks are part of their experiences. In other words, we want to know what is going on inside learners’ heads because we believe this might help us understand more about language learning. We differentiate between learners’ minds (cognition tools) and their brains, where we focus on imaging. I discuss imaging in the next chapter because importantly (and perhaps strangely), the mind and brain are not usually considered to be isomorphic. Interaction, feedback and task researchers typically turn to cognitive and psycholinguistics-based research tools to help us uncover information about individual differences and their relation to learning.

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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2020

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