Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-55597f9d44-ms7nj Total loading time: 0.246 Render date: 2022-08-17T23:04:33.491Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true } hasContentIssue true

Preface

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  17 September 2020

Cairns Craig
Affiliation:
University of Aberdeen
Get access

Summary

The chapters of Intending Scotland reflect – and reflect on – changes in Scotland since the establishment of the Scottish parliament, whose reshaping of Scotland's future requires a fresh understanding of its past. It deals with three groups of neglected Scottish thinkers. The first are the scientists – William Thomson, Peter Guthrie Tait, Macquorn Rankine and James Clerk Maxwell – who revolutionised physics by their discoveries in thermodynamics. The second is a group of biblical and classical scholars – John Ferguson McLennan, William Robertson Smith and Sir J. G. Frazer – whose work shaped the new science of anthropology from the 1860s till the 1920s. And the third – Andrew Seth, Robert Morrison MacIver, John Macmurray and Norman Kemp Smith – not only transformed the understanding of the history of Scottish philosophy but helped define the emergent discipline of sociology. I had hoped to include a chapter on Scottish women intellectuals of the nineteenth- and early-twentieth centuries but that project has grown so large it will need (and deserves) a book to itself.

Some of this book was researched while I was still at the University of Edinburgh, where I benefited from extended sabbatical leave, in part funded by a grant from the Arts and Humanities Research Council. I would like to thank both the AHRC and the University for their support, and to thank (again) my former colleagues in the English Literature Department for providing such a stimulating environment to work in. Since moving back to the University of Aberdeen, where I first taught in the 1970s, I have had the privilege of being Director of the AHRC Centre for Irish and Scottish Studies, and I have learned a great deal from those who have been involved in the Centre's work: I would particularly like to thank Edna Longley, Fran Brearton, Peter MacKay, John Kirk, Graham Walker and John Thomson in Queen's University, Belfast; David Dickson, Jane Ohlmeyer, Ian Campbell Ross, Terence Brown and Micheal O’Siochru in Trinity College, Dublin; and John Morrill of Cambridge University, as well as John MacKenzie, formerly of Lancaster University, and Karen Corrigan of Newcastle University. In Aberdeen, I have benefited both from the groundbreaking research and from the good humour of Patrick Crotty, Michael Brown, Andrew MacKillop, Ralph O’Connor, Rosalyn Trigger, Steve Dornan and Paul Shanks.

Type
Chapter
Information
Intending Scotland
Explorations in Scottish Culture since the Enlightenment
, pp. vi - vii
Publisher: Edinburgh University Press
Print publication year: 2020

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

  • Preface
  • Cairns Craig, University of Aberdeen
  • Book: Intending Scotland
  • Online publication: 17 September 2020
Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

  • Preface
  • Cairns Craig, University of Aberdeen
  • Book: Intending Scotland
  • Online publication: 17 September 2020
Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

  • Preface
  • Cairns Craig, University of Aberdeen
  • Book: Intending Scotland
  • Online publication: 17 September 2020
Available formats
×