Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-55597f9d44-t4qhp Total loading time: 0.376 Render date: 2022-08-12T16:20:05.328Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true } hasContentIssue true

Afterword

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  17 September 2020

Cairns Craig
Affiliation:
University of Aberdeen
Get access

Summary

In the 1980s, when Hamilton Finlay's garden was coming to maturity, another Scottish poet created an institution aimed at regaining poetry's relationship with the natural world. The International Institute of Geopoetics in Paris was launched in 1989 by Glasgow-born Kenneth White, then Professor of Twentieth-Century Poetics at the Sorbonne. Geopoetics was a response to the fact that ‘it was becoming more and more obvious that the earth (the biosphere) was in danger and that ways, both deep and efficient, would have to be worked out in order to protect it’, and that what was required was a return to ‘the richest poetics’ which ‘came from contact with the earth, from a plunge into biospheric space, from an attempt to read the lines of the world’. White linked his project to a tradition which included Patrick Geddes, but through Geddes ‘geopoetics’ was linked to a much longer tradition of Scottish environmentalism that went back to Scottish concerns with the consequences of deforestation, an issue that became urgent in many parts of the British Empire. as a result of the ruthless exploitation of natural resources.

One of the most important contributors to the understanding of deforestation was John Croumbie Brown, born in Haddington (1808–95), who started to research the impact of deforestation while a missionary in South Africa in the 1840s, and wrote numerous books on forestry after returning to Scotland to train in botany. Brown's theories had a significant impact on influential botanists such as Joseph Hooker, whose father had been Professor of Botany at Glasgow University from 1820 till 1841, and who followed his father as head of Kew Gardens in 1865. Hooker spent the summer of 1877 in California, collecting plant speciments with John Muir (born Dunbar, 1838 –1914), who had just begun his career as an environmental campaigner and who, by the early 1900s, would convince US President Theodore Roosevelt to establish National Parks to protect the ‘wilderness’ and the ancient sequoia forests of California. Six years earlier, in 1871, Muir had been visited by America's greatest writer and thinker, Ralph Waldo Emerson, at a time when Muir was living in isolation in the Californian forests: ‘I have everywhere testified to my friends, who should also be yours,’ Emerson wrote, ‘my happiness in finding you – the right man in the right place – in your mountain tabernacle’.

Type
Chapter
Information
Intending Scotland
Explorations in Scottish Culture since the Enlightenment
, pp. 271 - 272
Publisher: Edinburgh University Press
Print publication year: 2020

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

  • Afterword
  • Cairns Craig, University of Aberdeen
  • Book: Intending Scotland
  • Online publication: 17 September 2020
Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

  • Afterword
  • Cairns Craig, University of Aberdeen
  • Book: Intending Scotland
  • Online publication: 17 September 2020
Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

  • Afterword
  • Cairns Craig, University of Aberdeen
  • Book: Intending Scotland
  • Online publication: 17 September 2020
Available formats
×