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Introduction

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  14 July 2022

Mark Bartholomew
Affiliation:
University of Buffalo School of Law
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Summary

The Introduction sets out the central premise of the book: a sea change in our understanding of the human brain has deep, unexamined implications for intellectual property law. The Introduction begins to build the case for this argument by providing a brief description of the techniques used to detect the biological mechanisms attendant to different thought processes. It connects these techniques to the relevant actors whose perspectives structure the book’s three main parts: artists, audiences, and judges. Neuroscientific lessons for intellectual property law should be approached with a mixture of hope and caution. The hope comes from replacing some of the mistaken hunches about artists and audiences that have shaped intellectual property law for decades. The caution comes from a need to avoid junk science and neuroscientific theories that could do damage to the underlying aims of copyright, patent, and trademark law.

Type
Chapter
Information
Intellectual Property and the Brain
How Neuroscience Will Reshape Legal Protection for Creations of the Mind
, pp. 1 - 12
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2022

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  • Introduction
  • Mark Bartholomew
  • Book: Intellectual Property and the Brain
  • Online publication: 14 July 2022
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781009189545.001
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  • Introduction
  • Mark Bartholomew
  • Book: Intellectual Property and the Brain
  • Online publication: 14 July 2022
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781009189545.001
Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

  • Introduction
  • Mark Bartholomew
  • Book: Intellectual Property and the Brain
  • Online publication: 14 July 2022
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781009189545.001
Available formats
×