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11 - Social Accounting Matrices

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  06 January 2022

Ronald E. Miller
Affiliation:
University of Pennsylvania
Peter D. Blair
Affiliation:
George Mason University
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Summary

Chapter 11 expands the input–output framework to a broader class of economic analysis tools known as social accounting matrices (SAM) and other so-called extended input–output models to capture activities of income distribution in the economy in a more comprehensive and integrated way, including especially employment and social welfare features of an economy. The basic concepts of SAMs are explored and derived from the SNA introduced in Chapters 4 and 5, and the relationships between SAMs and input–output accounts are presented. The concept of SAM multipliers as well as the decomposition of SAM multipliers into components with specific economic interpretations are introduced and illustrated. Finally, techniques for balancing SAM accounts for internal accounting consistency are discussed and several illustrative applications of the use of SAMs are presented.

Type
Chapter
Information
Input-Output Analysis
Foundations and Extensions
, pp. 501 - 546
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2022

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