Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-56f9d74cfd-h5t46 Total loading time: 1.756 Render date: 2022-06-25T06:02:30.375Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true }

14 - Mixed and Dynamic Models

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  06 January 2022

Ronald E. Miller
Affiliation:
University of Pennsylvania
Peter D. Blair
Affiliation:
George Mason University
Get access

Summary

Chapter 14 describes so called mixed input–output models that are driven by a mix of output and final demand specifications rather than driven either solely by specification by final demand or total output. This chapter also introduces dynamic input–output models that more explicitly capture the role of capital investment and utilization in the production process.

Type
Chapter
Information
Input-Output Analysis
Foundations and Extensions
, pp. 678 - 721
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2022

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Almon, Clopper. 1970. “Investment in Input–Output Models and the Treatment of Secondary Products,” in Carter, Anne P. and Bródy, Andrew (eds.), Applications of Input–Output Analysis, Vol. 2 of Proceedings of the Fourth International Conference on Input–Output Techniques. Geneva, 1968. Amsterdam: North-Holland, pp. 103116.Google Scholar
Bródy, Andrew. 1995. “Truncation and Spectrum of the Dynamic Inverse,” Economic Systems Research, 7, 235247.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Carter, Anne P. 1974. “Energy, Environment and Economic Growth,” Bell Journal of Economics, 5, 578594.Google Scholar
Cole, Sam. 1988. “The Delayed Impacts of Plant Closures in a Reformulated Leontief Model,” Papers of the Regional Science Association, 65, 135149.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Cole, Sam. 1989. “Expenditure Lags in Impact Analysis,” Regional Studies, 23, 105116.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Cole, Sam. 1997. “Closure in Cole’s Reformulated Leontief Model: A Response to R. W. Jackson, M. Madden and H. A. Bowman,” Papers in Regional Science, 76, 2942.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Cole, Sam. 1999a. “In the Spirit of Miyazawa: Multipliers and the Metropolis,” in Hewings, Geoffrey J. D., Sonis, Michael, Madden, Moss and Kimura, Yoshio (eds.), Understanding and Interpreting Economic Structure. Berlin: Springer, pp. 263286.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Cole, Sam. 1999b. “The Phantom of the Matrix: Inverting the Case on Closure in Cole’s Model,” Papers in Regional Science, 78, 429436.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Dorfman, Robert, Samuelson, Paul A. and Solow, Robert M.. 1958. Linear Programming and Economic Analysis. New York: McGraw-Hill.Google Scholar
Duchin, Faye and Szyld, Daniel B.. 1985. “A Dynamic Input–Output Model with Assured Positive Output,” Metroeconomica, 37, 269282.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Eiser, D. and Roberts, D.. 2002. “The Employment and Output Effects of Changing Patterns of Afforestation in Scotland,” Journal of Agricultural Economics, 53, 6581.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Evans, W. Duane and Hoffenberg, Marvin. 1952. “The Interindustry Relations Study for 1947,” Review of Economics and Statistics, 34, 97142.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Findeis, Jill L. and Whittlesey, Norman K.. 1984. “The Secondary Economic Impacts of Irrigation Development in Washington,” Western Journal of Agricultural Economics, 9, 233243.Google Scholar
Isard, Walter and Kuenne, Robert E.. 1953. “The Impact of Steel upon the Greater New York–Philadelphia Industrial Region,” Review of Economics and Statistics, 35, 289301.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Jackson, Randall W., Madden, Moss and Bowman, Harry A.. 1997. “Closure in Cole’s Reformulated Leontief Model,” Papers in Regional Science, 76, 2128.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Jackson, Randall W. and Madden, Moss. 1999. “Closing the Case on Closure in Cole’s Model,” Papers in Regional Science, 78, 423427.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Johnson, Thomas G. and Kulshreshtha, Surendra N.. 1982. “Exogenizing Agriculture in an Input–Output Model to Estimate Relative Impacts of Different Farm Types,” Western Journal of Agricultural Economics, 7, 187198.Google Scholar
Leontief, Wassily. 1970. “The Dynamic Inverse,” in Carter, Anne P. and Bródy, Andrew (eds.), Contributions to Input–Output Analysis, Vol. 1 of Proceedings of the Fourth International Conference on Input–Output Techniques. Geneva, 1968. Amsterdam: North-Holland, pp. 1743.Google Scholar
Leontief, Wassily and Duchin, Faye. 1986. The Future Impact of Automation on Workers. New York: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Leung, PingSun and Pooley, Sam. 2002. “Regional Economic Impacts of Reductions in Fisheries Production: A Supply-Driven Approach,” Marine Resource Economics, 16, 251262.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Levine, Stephen H. and Romanoff, Eliahu. 1989. “Economic Impact Dynamics of Complex Engineering Project Scheduling,” IEEE Transactions on Systems, Man, and Cybernetics, 19, 232240.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Liew, Chong K. 1977. “Dynamic Multipliers for a Regional Input–Output Model,” Annals of Regional Science, 11, 94106.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Liew, Chung J. 2000. “The Dynamic Variable Input–Output Model: An Advancement from the Leontief Dynamic Input–Output Model,” Annals of Regional Science, 34, 591614.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Liew, Chung J. 2005. “Dynamic Variable Input–Output (VIO) Model and Price-Sensitive Dynamic Multipliers,” Annals of Regional Science, 39, 607627.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Miernyk, William H. and Sears, John T.. 1974. Air Pollution Abatement and Regional Economic Development. Lexington, MA: D.C. Heath and Co.Google Scholar
Miernyk, William H., Shellhammer, Kenneth L., Brown, Douglas M., Coccari, Ronald L., Gallagher, Charles J. and Wineman, Wesley H.. 1970. Simulating Regional Economic Development: An Interindustry Analysis of the West Virginia Economy. Lexington, MA: D.C. Heath and Co.Google Scholar
Miller, Ronald E. 1957. “The Impact of the Aluminum Industry on the Pacific Northwest: A Regional Input–Output Analysis,” Review of Economics and Statistics, 39, 200209.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Mules, Trevor J. 1983. “Some Simulations with a Sequential Input–Output Model,” Papers of the Regional Science Association, 51, 197204.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Papadas, Christos T. and Dahl, Dale C.. 1999. “Supply-Driven Input–Output Multipliers,” Journal of Agricultural Economics, 50, 269285.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Petkovich, M. D. and Ching, C. T. K.. 1978. “Modifying a One Region Leontief Input–Output Model to Show Sector Capacity Constraints,” Western Journal of Agricultural Economics, 3, 173179.Google Scholar
ten Raa, Thijs. 1986. “Dynamic Input–Output Analysis with Distributed Activities,” Review of Economics and Statistics, 68, 300310.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
ten Raa, Thijs. 2005. The Economics of Input–Output Analysis. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Ritz, Philip M. and Spaulding, Elizabeth. 1975. “Basic I-O Terminology,” unpublished memorandum, US Department of Commerce, Bureau of Economic Analysis, Interindustry Economics Division, February 25.Google Scholar
Roberts, D. 1994. “A Modified Leontief Model for Analysing the Impact of Milk Quotas on the Wider Economy,” Journal of Agricultural Economics, 45, 90101.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Romanoff, Eliahu. 1984, “Interindustry Analysis for Regional Growth and Development: The Dynamics of Manpower Issues,” Socio-Economic Planning Sciences, 18, 353363.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Romanoff, Eliahu and Levine, Stephen H.. 1977. “Interregional Sequential Interindustry Modeling: A Preliminary Analysis of Regional Growth and Decline in a Two Region Case,” Northeast Regional Science Review, 7, 87101.Google Scholar
Romanoff, Eliahu and Levine, Stephen H.. 1981. “Anticipatory and Responsive Sequential Interindustry Models,” IEEE Transactions on Systems, Man, and Cybernetics, 11, 181186.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Romanoff, Eliahu and Levine, Stephen H.. 1986. “Capacity Limitations, Inventory, and Time-Phased Production in the Sequential Interindustry Model,” Papers of the Regional Science Association, 59, 7391.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Romanoff, Eliahu and Levine, Stephen H.. 1990a. “Combined Regional Impact Dynamics of Several Construction Megaprojects,” Regional Science Review, 17, 8593.Google Scholar
Romanoff, Eliahu and Levine, Stephen H.. 1990b. “Technical Change in Production Processes of the Sequential Interindustry Model,” Metroeconomica, 41, 118.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Romanoff, Eliahu and Levine, Stephen H.. 1991. “Technical Change and Regional Development: Some Further Developments with the Sequential Interindustry Model,” in Boyce, David E., Nijkamp, Peter and Shafer, Dani (eds.), Regional Science: Retrospect and Prospect. Berlin: Springer-Verlag, pp. 251275.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Romanoff, Eliahu and Levine, Stephen H.. 1993. “Information, Interindustry Dynamics and the Service Industries,” Environment and Planning, A, 25, 305316.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Steenge, Albert E. and Reyes, Rachel C.. 2020. “Return of the Capital Coefficients Matrix,” Economic Systems Research, 32, 439–450.Google Scholar
Steenge, Albert E. and Thissen, Mark J. P. M.. 2005. “A New Matrix Theorem: Interpretation in Terms of Internal Trade Structure and Implications for Dynamic Systems,” Journal of Economics, 84, 7194.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Steinback, Scott. 2004. “Using Ready-Made Regional Input–Output Models to Estimate Backward Linkage Effects of Exogenous Output Shocks,” Review of Regional Studies, 34, 5771.Google Scholar
Tanjuakio, Rodolfo, Hastings, Steven E. and Tytus, Peter J.. 1996. “The Economic Contribution of Agriculture in Delaware,” Agricultural and Resource Economics Review, 25, 4653.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Tiebout, Charles M. 1969. “An Empirical Regional Input–Output Projection Model: The State of Washington 1980,” Review of Economics and Statistics, 51, 334340.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×