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1 - Introduction and Overview

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  06 January 2022

Ronald E. Miller
Affiliation:
University of Pennsylvania
Peter D. Blair
Affiliation:
George Mason University
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Summary

The introductory chapter recaps the genesis of the field of input–output or interindustry analysis as a widely utilized framework to analyze the interdependence of industries in an economy. The introduction chronicles how the input–output framework, conceived originally by Wassily Leontief in the 1930s, has matured over the last seven decades to become a key component of many types of economic analysis and one of the most widely applied methods in economics. This book presents the framework set forth by Leontief and explores the many extensions that have been developed, and the introduction concludes by summarizing the key features of the succeeding chapters, appendices, and related online resources chronicling those developments.

Type
Chapter
Information
Input-Output Analysis
Foundations and Extensions
, pp. 1 - 9
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2022

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References

Baumol, William. 2000. “Leontief’s Great Leap Forward,” Economic Systems Research, 12, 141152.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Leontief, Wassily. 1936. “Quantitative Input–Output Relations in the Economic System of the United States,” Review of Economics and Statistics, 18, 105125.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Leontief, Wassily. 1941. The Structure of American Economy 1919–1939. New York: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Miller, Ronald E. and Blair, Peter D.. 1985. Input–Output Analysis: Foundations and Extensions. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall.Google Scholar
Miller, Ronald E. and Blair, Peter D.. 2009. Input–Output Analysis: Foundations and Extensions (Second Edition). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Polenske, Karen R. 1999. “Wassily W. Leontief, 1905–1999,” Economic Systems Research, 11, 341348.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Polenske, Karen R. 2004. “Leontief’s ‘Magnificent Machine’ and Other Contributions to Applied Economics,” in Dietzenbacher, Erik and Lahr, Michael L. (eds.), Wassily Leontief and Input–Output Economics. New York: Cambridge University Press, pp. 929.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Polenske, Karen R. and Skolka, Jiří V. (eds.). 1976. Advances in Input–Output Analysis. Proceedings of the Sixth International Conference on Input–Output Techniques. Vienna, April 22–26, 1974. Cambridge, MA: Ballinger.Google Scholar
Rose, Adam and Miernyk, William. 1989. “Input–Output Analysis: The First Fifty Years,” Economic Systems Research, 1, 229271.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Stone, Richard. 1984. “Where Are We Now? A Short Account of Input–Output Studies and Their Present Trends,” in United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO), Proceedings of the Seventh International Conference on Input–Output Techniques. New York: United Nations, pp. 439459. [Reprinted in Ira Sohn (ed.). 1986. Readings in Input-Output Analysis. New York: Oxford University Press, pp. 13–31.]Google Scholar

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