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Part III - The Cultural and Linguistic Significance of Bell Beakers along the Atlantic Fringe

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  29 April 2023

Kristian Kristiansen
Affiliation:
Göteborgs Universitet, Sweden
Guus Kroonen
Affiliation:
Universiteit Leiden
Eske Willerslev
Affiliation:
University of Copenhagen
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Chapter
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The Indo-European Puzzle Revisited
Integrating Archaeology, Genetics, and Linguistics
, pp. 127 - 244
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2023

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References

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