Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-768ffcd9cc-nzrtw Total loading time: 0.782 Render date: 2022-12-07T03:47:47.236Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "useRatesEcommerce": false } hasContentIssue true

2 - Compulsive Buying: Cultural Contributors and Consequences

from Section I - Acquisitive Impulses

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  06 July 2010

Elias Aboujaoude
Affiliation:
Stanford University School of Medicine, California
Lorrin M. Koran
Affiliation:
Stanford University School of Medicine, California
Get access

Summary

Compulsive buying is a multidetermined disorder. The pursuit of material goods, and the tendency toward compulsive buying that often accompanies it, has been accelerated by cultural wrinkle, the burgeoning of marketplaces. The culture, communities, families, and individuals - compulsive buying hurts them all. Compulsive shopping is to bankruptcy as steroids are to home runs. Relationship costs, not the least of which is an individual's relationship with himself or herself, are significant, too. Compulsive buying in children is clearly associated with family histories of compulsive/addictive behaviors. It has also been shown to be associated among adolescents with eating disorders, drinking alcohol, smoking, and early life sexual experiences. Research shows that college students and young adults are particularly vulnerable to compulsive buying. Healthier childhood is often a simpler childhood, one that puts good communication and quality time with family and friends far above engagement with the material world.
Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2010

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)
8
Cited by

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×