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7 - Promising Practice in Government Schools in Vietnam

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  19 November 2021

Colleen McLaughlin
Affiliation:
University of Cambridge
Alan Ruby
Affiliation:
University of Pennsylvania
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Summary

Conventional measures such as PISA judge the Vietnamese school system to have high levels of pupil performance and attainment. This chapter explores the interesting features that might account for the success rate in tests. The research explores the perspectives of parents, local business owners and teacher trainers. Key areas to emerge were policy, accountability, teaching, leadership and school community partnership.

Type
Chapter
Information
Implementing Educational Reform
Cases and Challenges
, pp. 127 - 148
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2021

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References

Boyden, J. (2013). What can Vietnam’s excellent schools teach us about education quality and equality? Available at: https://oxfamblogs.org/fp2p/what-can-vietnams-excellent-schools-teachus-about-education-quality-and-equality/ (accessed April 2018).Google Scholar
Dang, H. A. H. and Glewwe, P. (2017). Well begun, but aiming higher: A review of Vietnam’s education trends in the past 20 years and emerging challenges. RISE Working Paper 17/017, December. London: DFID.Google Scholar
Elwick, A. and McAleavy, T. (2015). Interesting Cities: Five Approaches to Urban School Reform. Education Development Trust. www.educationdevelopmenttrust.com/our-research-and-insights/research/interesting-cities-five-approaches-to-urban-schoolGoogle Scholar
General Statistics Office of Viet Nam. (2016). Viet Nam Statistical Handbook 2016. Hanoi: GSO.Google Scholar
OECD. (2013). PISA 2012 Results: What Makes Schools Successful? Resources, Policies and Practices, Vol. IV. Paris: PISA, OECD.Google Scholar
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OECD. (2016b). PISA 2015 Results: Policies and Practices for Successful Schools, Vol. II. Paris: PISA, OECD.Google Scholar
Sarason, S. (1990). The Predictable Failure of Educational Reform: Can We Change Course Before It’s Too Late San Francisco, CA: Wiley.Google Scholar
VUFO (Vietnam Union of Friendship Organisations). (2015). Vietnam Maintains 20% of State Budget Spending for Education in 2015. Available at: www.ngocentre.org.vn/news/vietnam-maintains-20-state-budget-spending-education-2015 (accessed November 2017).Google Scholar
World Bank. (2003). World Development Report 2004: Making Services Work for Poor People. Washington, DC: World Bank.Google Scholar

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