Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-99c86f546-t82dr Total loading time: 0.408 Render date: 2021-12-01T23:21:52.060Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

22 - Paediatric outcome after assisted reproductive technology

from SECTION 4 - CLINICAL SEQUELAE

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 June 2014

Alastair G Sutcliffe
Affiliation:
University College Medical School
Hilary Critchley
Affiliation:
University of Edinburgh
Iain Cameron
Affiliation:
University of Southampton
Stephen Smith
Affiliation:
Lee Kong Chian School of Medicine
Get access

Summary

It's hardly a Darwinian way of reproducing.

DAVE, NOTTINGHAM TAXI DRIVER

Before overviewing the literature concerning paediatric follow-up of children conceived by assisted reproductive technology (ART), it is worth considering the difficulties facing researchers in this area. When trying to establish an international study of pre-implantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) outcome the author travelled around PGD centres to try to get the study under way. The vast majority of ill effects arise from the birth of children from twin, triplet, quadruplet or higher multiple pregnancies. Fifty per cent of twins are born at less than 38 weeks of gestation and at less than 2500 g. The birth rate of twins has doubled in most western countries over the past 25 years (and this is approximately 90% due to ART.)

An anecdote from one clinic visited in the USA, concerning multiple births and the relationship between a fertility team and a neonatal team, comes to mind. The head of neonates invited the fertility clinicians to visit the unit to see some of the premature babies born of higher order birth after fertility treatments. When no one visited he raised the stakes by offering to nail a silver dollar to the door frame outside the main entrance to the neonatal unit (in the style of Moby Dick.) Still no one visited. This may not represent every view but certainly represents denial.

Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2005

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Send book to Kindle

To send this book to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Send book to Dropbox

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×