Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Hostname: page-component-848d4c4894-2xdlg Total loading time: 0 Render date: 2024-06-14T06:08:07.898Z Has data issue: false hasContentIssue false

10 - German neo-Hegelianism and a plea for another Hegel

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 December 2013

Andreas Grossmann
Affiliation:
Technical University Darmstadt
Nicholas Boyle
Affiliation:
University of Cambridge
Liz Disley
Affiliation:
University of Cambridge
John Walker
Affiliation:
Birkbeck College, University of London
Get access

Summary

According to a celebrated dictum in the preface to Hegel's Elements of the Philosophy of Right, philosophy's concern is to comprehend its own time in thought. Notoriously, this sentence is often misunderstood, as though it were Hegel's intention to sanction and legitimate the Prussian state of the time. Rudolf Haym contributed greatly to this view's lasting influence with his lectures on ‘Hegel and His Time’, published in 1857. Haym could discern in Hegel only the philosopher in service to the Prussian state in the Restoration period, a philosopher who accommodated that state as a matter of course, even ‘cuddling up’ to it. Thus ‘the Hegelian system’ and especially the philosophy of right had become, according to him, ‘the scholarly abode of the Prussian Restoration's spirit’. Friedrich Meinecke, in his major work Weltbürgertum und Nationalstaat, which enjoyed numerous editions following its first publication at the end of 1907, believed he could detect a nearly direct intellectual historical lineage from Hegel to Bismarck. Meinecke admittedly reveals himself to be influenced more by Ranke than by Hegel. The former acted as the intermediary between Hegel and Bismarck, whom Meinecke greatly admired. On the other hand, Meinecke is concerned that in the work of Hegel, ‘purely empirical knowledge is once again obscured’ and that ‘this material world [is transformed] into a mere shadow play’ as a result of ‘his view of nation and state’. The constitutional legal scholar Hermann Heller drew upon Meinecke in his 1921 book Hegel und der nationale Machtstaatsgedanke in Deutschland (Hegel and the Notion of the National Power State in Germany) when he pointedly characterised Hegel as the ‘first and most thorough herald of the idea of the modern power state [Machtstaat]’. ‘The national ideology of the power state’, Heller explained in the introduction to his treatise, ‘is in fact itself the offspring of Idealist philosophy, and its father is none other than Hegel’., Such a declarative statement does not, however, indicate any retreat from Hegel. On the contrary, Heller revealed his assured belief that several aspects of ‘Hegel's power politics [Machtpolitik]’ would need to become part of ‘Germany's public opinion…if the German nation is to rescue itself from this painful present into a better future’.

Type
Chapter
Information
The Impact of Idealism
The Legacy of Post-Kantian German Thought
, pp. 232 - 259
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2013

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Haym, R., Hegel und seine Zeit(Berlin: Rudolf Gaertner, 1857), 359Google Scholar
Heller, H., Hegel und der nationale Machtstaatsgedanke in Deutschland: ein Beitrag zur politischen Geistesgeschichte (1921),
Orientierung und Entscheidung, vol. i of Gesammelte Schriften, ed. Müller, C., 3 vols. (Tübingen: Mohr, 1992), 23
Heller, H., ‘Einleitung in G. Hegel, W. F., Die Verfassung Deutschlands’ (1920), in Gesammelte Schriften, ed. Müller, C., 3 vols. (Tübingen: Mohr, 1992), i, 15–20Google Scholar
Rosenzweig, F., Hegel und der Staat(1920), ed. Lachmann, F. (Berlin: Suhrkamp, 2010), 18Google Scholar
Schönfeld, W., Ueber den Begriff einer dialektischen Jurisprudenz(Greifswald: Bamberg, 1929), 41–2Google Scholar
Larenz, K., Das Problem der Rechtsgeltung(1929) (Darmstadt:Wissenschaftliche Buchgesellschaft, 1967), 26; cf. 22, 31, 36Google Scholar
Schönfeld, W., Die Geschichte der Rechtswissenschaft im Spiegel der Metaphysik, vol. ii of Larenz, Karl (ed.), Reich und Recht in der deutschen Philosophie (Stuttgart: Kohlhammer, 1943), 510f., 513f., 519Google Scholar
Binder, J., Führerauslese in der Demokratie(Langensalza: Beyer, 1929), 6Google Scholar
Larenz, K., ‘Vom Wesen der Strafe’, Zeitschrift für Deutsche Kulturphilosophie 2 (1936), 26–50, at 26Google Scholar
Hegel, G. W. F., Jenaer Systementwürfe iii: Naturphilosophie und Philosophie des Geistes, ed. Horstmann, R.-P. (Hamburg: Meiner, 1987), 225Google Scholar
Schmitt, C., Staat, Bewegung, Volk(Hamburg: Hanseatische Verlags-Anstalt, 1933), 31fGoogle Scholar
Larenz, K., ‘Die Aufgabe der Rechtsphilosophie’, in Zeitschrift für Deutsche Kulturphilosophie 4 (1938), 209–43, at 235Google Scholar
Larenz, K., Deutsche Rechtserneuerung und Rechtsphilosophie(Tübingen: Mohr, 1934), 30Google Scholar
Schmitt, C., Der Hüter der Verfassung(1931) (Berlin: Duncker & Humblot, 1985)Google Scholar
Larenz, K. (ed.), Grundfragen der neuen Rechtswissenschaft(Berlin: Junker und Dünnhaupt, 1935) (Vorwort)
Larenz, K., ‘Rechtsperson und subjektives Recht: Zur Wandlung der Rechtsgrundbegriffe’, in Larenz, K. (ed.), Grundfragen der neuen Rechtswissenschaft(Berlin: Junker und Dünnhaupt, 1935), 225–60, at 241Google Scholar
Böckenförde, E.-W., Recht, Staat, Freiheit: Studien zur Rechtsphilosophie, Staatstheorie und Verfassungsgeschichte(Frankfurt am Main: Suhrkamp, 1991), 112 (emphasis in original)Google Scholar
Bubner, R., Welche Rationalität bekommt der Gesellschaft? Vier Kapitel aus dem Naturrecht(Frankfurt am Main: Suhrkamp, 1996), 164Google Scholar
Bubner, R., Polis und Staat: Grundlinien der politischen Philosophie(Frankfurt am Main: Suhrkamp, 2002), 170, 173Google Scholar
Hegel, G. W. F., Elements of the Philosophy of Right, ed. Wood, Allen (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1991) (hereafter PR), 21Google Scholar
Heller, H., Hegel und der nationale Machtstaatsgedanke in Deutschland: ein Beitrag zur politischen Geistesgeschichte (1921), in Orientierung und Entscheidung, vol. of Gesammelte Schriften, ed. Müller, C., 3 vols. (Tübingen: Mohr, 1992), 25Google Scholar
Heller, H., ‘Hegel und die deutsche Politik’ (1924), in Gesammelte Schriften, i, 243–55, at 244, 247 and 255
Hartwig, M., ‘Die Krise der deutschen Staatslehre und die Rückbesinnung auf Hegel in der Weimarer Zeit’, in Jermann, C. (ed.), Anspruch und Leistung von Hegels Rechtsphilosophie (Stuttgart-Bad Cannstatt: Frommann-Holzboog, 1987), 239–75Google Scholar
Müller, C. and Staff, I. (eds.), Staatslehre in der Weimarer Republik: Hermann Heller zu ehren (Frankfurt am Main: Suhrkamp, 1985)
Rosenzweig, F., Hegel und der Staat (1920), ed. Lachmann, F. (Berlin: Suhrkamp, 2010), 527Google Scholar
Windelband, W., ‘Die Erneuerung des Hegelianismus’ (keynote address at the meeting of the Akademie of 25 April 1910), Sitzungsberichte der Heidelberger Akademie der Wissenschaften (Heidelberg: Winter, 1910), lecture no. 10, 3–15, at 8Google Scholar
Levy, H., Die Hegel-Renaissance in der deutschen Philosophie, mit besonderer Berücksichtigung des Neukantianismus (Berlin: Pan-Verlag, 1927), 90Google Scholar
Glockner, H., ‘Stand und Auffassung der Hegelschen Philosophie in Deutschland, hundert Jahre nach seinem Tode’ (1930), in Beiträge zum Verständnis und zur Kritik Hegels sowie zur Umgestaltung seiner Geisteswelt, Hegel-Studien, suppl. 2 (Bonn: Bouvier, 1965), 272–84, at 277Google Scholar
Glockner, H., ‘Hegelrenaissance und Neuhegelianismus: eine Säkularbetrachtung’ (1931), in Beiträge zum Verständnis und zur Kritik Hegels sowie zur Umgestaltung seiner Geisteswelt, 285–311, at 289Google Scholar
Larenz, K., Die Rechts- und Staatsphilosophie des deutschen Idealismus und ihre Gegenwartsbedeutung, Handbuch der Philosophie 4, suppl. D (Munich and Berlin: Oldenbourg, 1933), 186Google Scholar
Glockner, , ‘Deutsche Philosophie’, Zeitschrift für Deutsche Kulturphilosophie 1 (1935), 3–39, at 6fGoogle Scholar
Schild, W., ‘Die Ambivalenz einer Neo-Philosophie: zu Josef Kohlers Neuhegelianismus’, in Sprenger, G. (ed.), Deutsche Rechts- und Sozialphilosophie um 1900, Archiv für Rechts- und Sozialphilosophie Beiheft 43 (Stuttgart: Steiner, 1991), 46–65, at 64Google Scholar
Larenz, K., Methodenlehre der Rechtswissenschaft (Berlin: Springer, 1991)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Richtiges Recht: Grundzüge einer Rechtsethik (Munich: Beck, 1979)
Dulckeit, G., Römische Rechtsgeschichte: ein Studienbuch (Munich: Beck, 1995)Google Scholar
Hartwig, M., ‘Die Krise der deutschen Staatslehre und die Rückbesinnung auf Hegel in der Weimarer Zeit’, in Jermann, C. (ed.), Anspruch und Leistung von Hegels Rechtsphilosophie (Stuttgart-Bad Cannstatt: Frommann-Holzboog, 1987), 239–75, at 265ffGoogle Scholar
Lepsius, O., Die gegensatzaufhebende Begriffsbildung: Methodenentwicklungen in der Weimarer Republik und ihr Verhältnis zur Ideologisierung der Rechtswissenschaft unter dem Nationalsozialismus(Munich: C. H. Beck, 1994)Google Scholar
Weinkauff, H., Die deutsche Justiz und der Nationalsozialismus: ein Überblick, Quellen und Darstellungen zur Zeitgeschichte 16/ (Stuttgart: DVA, 1968)Google Scholar
Rottleuthner, H. (ed.), Recht, Rechtsphilosophie und Nationalsozialismus, Archiv für Rechts- und Sozialphilosophie, suppl. 18 (Wiesbaden: Franz Steiner, 1983)
Böckenförde, E.-W. (ed.), Staatsrecht und Staatsrechtslehre im Dritten Reich(Heidelberg: Müller, 1985)
Rüthers, B., Entartetes Recht: Rechtslehren und Kronjuristen im Dritten Reich(Munich: DTV, 1988)Google Scholar
Dreier, R. and Sellert, W. (ed.), Recht und Justiz im ‘Dritten Reich’ (Frankfurt am Main: Suhrkamp, 1989)
Stolleis, M., Recht im Unrecht: Studien zur Rechtsgeschichte des Nationalsozialismus (Frankfurt am Main: Suhrkamp, 1994)
Rückert, J. and Willoweit, D. (ed.), Die deutsche Rechtsgeschichte in der NS-Zeit: ihre Vorgeschichte und ihre Nachwirkungen, Beiträge zur Rechtsgeschichte des 20. Jahrhunderts 12 (Tübingen: Mohr Siebeck, 1995)
Larenz, K. (ed.), Grundfragen der neuen Rechtswissenschaft (Berlin: Junker und Dünnhaupt, 1935)
Dulckeit, G., Rechtsbegriff und Rechtsgestalt: Untersuchungen zu Hegels Philosophie des Rechts und ihrer Gegenwartsbedeutung (Berlin: Junker und Dünnhaupt, 1936), 113Google Scholar
Larenz, K., Rechts- und Staatsphilosophie der Gegenwart(Berlin: Junker und Dünnhaupt, 1931), 108fGoogle Scholar
Schönfeld, W., Ueber den Begriff einer dialektischen Jurisprudenz (Greifswald: Bamberg, 1929), 35, 30, 41–2, 44, 46Google Scholar
Binder, J., Philosophie des Rechts (Berlin: Stilke, 1925)Google Scholar
Dreier, R., ‘Julius Binder (1870–1939): ein Rechtsphilosoph zwischen Kaiserreich und Nationalsozialismus’, in Dreier, R., Recht–Staat–Vernunft: Studien zur Rechtstheorie (Frankfurt am Main: Suhrkamp, 1991), 142–67Google Scholar
Jakob, E., Grundzüge der Rechtsphilosophie Julius Binders (Baden-Baden: Nomos, 1996)Google Scholar
Rudolf Hermann: Aufsätze–Tagebücher–Briefe, ed. by Wiebel, A. (Münster: LIT Verlag, 2009), 305ff
Binder, J., ‘Der autoritäre Staat’, Logos 22 (1933), 126–60, at 151Google Scholar
Binder, J., Führerauslese in der Demokratie (Langensalza: Beyer, 1929)Google Scholar
Binder, J., Der deutsche Volksstaat (Tübingen: Mohr, 1934), 35Google Scholar
Wildt, M., ‘Die Ungleichheit des Volkes: “Volksgemeinschaft” in der politischen Kommunikation der Weimarer Republik’, in Bajohr, F. and Wildt, M. (eds.), Volksgemeinschaft: neue Forschungen zur Gesellschaft des Nationalsozialismus (Frankfurt am Main: Fischer, 2009), 24–40Google Scholar
‘Volksgemeinschaft und Führererwartung in der Weimarer Republik’, in Daniel, U. (ed.), Politische Kultur und Medienwirklichkeiten in den 1920er Jahren (Munich: Oldenbourg, 2010), 181–204
Binder, J., ‘Die Bedeutung der Rechtsphilosophie für die Erneuerung des Privatrechts’, in Hedermann, J. W. (ed.), Zur Erneuerung des Bürgerlichen Rechts, with a foreword by Reichsminister Dr Frank (Munich: Beck, 1938), 18–36; 20f., 36Google Scholar
Eckert, J., ‘Was war die Kieler Schule?’, in Säcker, F. J. (ed.), Recht und Rechtslehre im Nationalsozialismus, Kieler rechtswissenschaftliche Abhandlungen, n.s., 1 (Baden-Baden: Nomos, 1992), 37–70Google Scholar
Larenz, K., ‘Rechtswahrer und Philosoph: zum Tode Julius Binders’, Zeitschrift für Deutsche Kulturphilosophie 6 (1940), 1–14, at 12Google Scholar
Larenz, K., Über Gegenstand und Methode des völkischen Rechtsdenkens (Berlin: Junker und Dünnhaupt, 1938), 8fGoogle Scholar
Hegel, G. W. F., Hegel and the Human Spirit: a translation of the Jena Lectures on the Philosophy of Spirit (1805–06) with commentary, ed. Rauch, Leo (Detroit: Wayne State University Press, 1983), 141Google Scholar
Zenkert, G., ‘Konstitutive Macht: Hegel zur Verfassung’, in Macht: Begriff und Wirkung in der politischen Philosophie der Gegenwart, ed. Krause, R. and Rölli, M. (Bielefeld: TranscriptVerlag, 2008), 19–32Google Scholar
Die Aufgabe der Rechtsphilosophie’, in Zeitschrift für Deutsche Kulturphilosophie 4 (1938), 209–43, at 216
Schmitt, C., Staat, Bewegung, Volk (Hamburg: Hanseatische Verlagsanstalt, 1933), 31fGoogle Scholar
Schmitt, C., Über die drei Arten des rechtswissenschaftlichen Denkens (Hamburg: Hanseatische Verlagsanstalt, 1934; 2nd edn, Berlin 1993), 39Google Scholar
Schmitt, C., ‘Faschistische und nationalsozialistische Rechtswissenschaft’, in Deutsche Juristenzeitung 41 (1936), 619–20, at 620Google Scholar
Larenz, K., ‘Vom Wesen der Strafe’, Zeitschrift für Deutsche Kulturphilosophie, 2 (1936), 26–50
Larenz's, K. book review in Zeitschrift für Deutsche Kulturphilosophie 1 (1935), 112–18, at 114
Pöggeler, O., ‘Philosophie und Nationalsozialismus – am Beispiel Heideggers’, in Heidegger in seiner Zeit (Munich: Fink, 1999), 195–216, at 200Google Scholar
Mehring, R., Pathetisches Denken: Carl Schmitts Denkweg am Leitfaden Hegels; katholische Grundstellung und antimarxistische Hegelstrategie(Berlin: Duncker & Humblot, 1989)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Grossmann, A., ‘Volksgeist – Grund einer praktischen Welt oder metaphysische Spukgestalt? Anmerkungen zur Problemgeschichte eines nicht nur Hegelschen Theorems’, in Grossmann, A. and Jamme, C. (eds.), Metaphysik der praktischen Welt: Perspektiven im Anschluß an Hegel und Heidegger(Amsterdam: Rodopi, 2000), 60–77Google Scholar
‘Volksgeist/Volksseele’, in Ritter, J., Gründer, K. and Gabriel, G. (eds.), Historisches Wörterbuch der Philosophie (Basel: Schwabe, 2001), , 1102–7
Mährlein, C., Volksgeist und Recht: Hegels Philosophie der Einheit und ihre Bedeutung in der Rechtswissenschaft (Würzburg: Königshausen & Neumann, 2000), esp. 171ffGoogle Scholar
Larenz, K., ‘Volksgeist und Recht: zur Revision der Rechtsanschauung der Historischen Schule’, Zeitschrift für Deutsche Kulturphilosophie 1 (1935), 40–60, at 42fGoogle Scholar
Larenz, K., Deutsche Rechtserneuerung und Rechtsphilosophie (Tübingen: Mohr, 1934), 34Google Scholar
Larenz, , ‘Staat und Religion bei Hegel: ein Beitrag zur systematischen Interpretation der Hegelschen Rechtsphilosophie’, in Larenz, K. (ed.), Rechtsidee und Staatsgedanke: Festgabe für Julius Binder (Berlin: Junker und Dünnhaupt, 1930), 243–63, at 251Google Scholar
Frassek, R., Von der ‘völkischen Lebensordnung’ zum Recht: die Umsetzung weltanschaulicher Programmatik in den schuldrechtlichen Schriften von Karl Larenz (1903–1993) (Baden-Baden: Nomos, 1996)Google Scholar
Anderbrügge, K., Völkisches Rechtsdenken: zur Rechtslehre in der Zeit des Nationalsozialismus, Beiträge zur politischen Wissenschaft 28 (Berlin: Duncker & Humblot, 1978), 203ffGoogle Scholar
Torre, M. La, ‘Der Kampf wider das subjektive Recht: Karl Larenz und die nationalsozialistische Rechtslehre’, in Rechtstheorie 23 (1992), 355–95Google Scholar
Rüthers, B., ‘Die Ideologie des Nationalsozialismus in der Entwicklung des deutschen Rechts von 1933 bis 1945’, in Säcker, F. J. (ed.), Recht und Rechtslehre im Nationalsozialismus, Kieler rechtswissenschaftliche Abhandlungen, n.s., 1 (Baden-Baden: Nomos, 1992), 17–36, at 30fGoogle Scholar
Canaris, C.-W., ‘“Falsches Geschichtsbild von der Rechtsperversion im Nationalsozialismus” durch ein Porträt von Karl Larenz?’, both in JuristenZeitung 66 (2011), 593–601 and 879–88CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Larenz, K., ‘Sittlichkeit und Recht: Untersuchungen zur Geschichte des deutschen Rechtsdenkens und zur Sittenlehre’, in Larenz, K. (ed.), Reich und Recht in der deutschen Philosophie, 2 vols. (Stuttgart, 1943), , 169–412, at 401, 407Google Scholar
Popper, K., The High Tide of Prophecy: Hegel, Marx, and the aftermath, vol. of The Open Society and Its Enemies, 2 vols. (London: Routledge, 1945), 56, 75Google Scholar
Topitsch, E., Die Sozialphilosophie Hegels als Heilslehre und Herrschaftsideologie (Neuwied: Luchterhand, 1967)Google Scholar
Kiesewetter, H., Von Hegel zu Hitler: die politische Verwirklichung einer totalitären Machtstaatsideologie in Deutschland (1815–1945) (Frankfurt am Main: Peter Lang, 1995)Google Scholar
Marcuse, H., Reason and Revolution: Hegel and the rise of social theory, 2nd edn (London: Routledge, 1955), 402Google Scholar
Marcuse, H., Vernunft und Revolution: Hegel und die Entstehung der Gesellschaftstheorie (Berlin: Hermann Luchterhand, 1962)Google Scholar
Honneth, A., Das Recht der Freiheit: Grundriß einer demokratischen Sittlichkeit (Berlin: Suhrkamp, 2011)Google Scholar
Hacke, J., Philosophie der Bürgerlichkeit: die liberalkonservative Begründung der Bundesrepublik (Göttingen: Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht, 2006)Google Scholar
Hölzing, , ‘Zur politischen Ideengeschichte der Bonner Republik’, in Philosophische Rundschau 57 (2010), 33–48CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Spaemann, R., Über Gott und die Welt: eine Autobiographie in Gesprächen (Stuttgart: Klett-Cotta, 2012), 80ffGoogle Scholar
Böckenförde, E.-W., Wissenschaft, Politik, Verfassungsgericht (Berlin: Suhrkamp, 2011), 305–486, at 378, 381 and 367, 369Google Scholar
Böckenförde, E.-W., Recht, Staat, Freiheit: Studien zur Rechtsphilosophie, Staatstheorie und Verfassungsgeschichte (Frankfurt am Main: Suhrkamp, 1991), 113.
Bubner, R., Welche Rationalität bekommt der Gesellschaft? Vier Kapitel aus dem Naturrecht (Frankfurt am Main: Suhrkamp, 1996), 159fGoogle Scholar
Vieweg, K., Das Denken der Freiheit: Hegels Grundlinien der Philosophie des Rechts (Munich: Fink, 2012)Google Scholar

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×