Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Hostname: page-component-5d59c44645-jb2ch Total loading time: 0 Render date: 2024-03-02T20:29:33.481Z Has data issue: false hasContentIssue false

References

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  27 July 2023

Panayiotis Christoforou
Affiliation:
University of Oxford
Get access

Summary

Image of the first page of this content. For PDF version, please use the ‘Save PDF’ preceeding this image.'
Type
Chapter
Information
Imagining the Roman Emperor
Perceptions of Rulers in the High Empire
, pp. 238 - 264
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2023

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Abbott, F. F. and Johnson, A. C. 1926. Municipal administration in the Roman empire. Princeton, NJ.Google Scholar
Abdy, R. and Harling, N. 2005. ‘Two important new Roman coins’, Numismatic Chronicle 165, 175–8.Google Scholar
Agamben, G. 1998. Homo sacer: sovereign power and bare life. Stanford, CA.Google Scholar
Ahl, F. 1984. ‘The art of safe criticism in Greece and Rome’, American Journal of Philology 105, 174208.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Aldrete, G. S. 2003. Gestures and acclamations in ancient Rome. Baltimore, MD.Google Scholar
Alexander, L. (ed.) 1991. Images of empire. Sheffield.Google Scholar
Alföldy, G. 1985. The social history of Rome. London.Google Scholar
Ando, C. 1999. ‘Was Rome a polis?’, Classical Antiquity 18, 534.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ando, C. 2000. Imperial ideology and provincial loyalty in the Roman empire. Berkeley, CA.Google Scholar
Ando, C. 2013. ‘The origins and import of republican constitutionalism’, Cardozo Law Review 34, 917.Google Scholar
Andrews, A. C. 1949. ‘The Roman craze for surmullets’, The Classical Weekly 42, 186–8.Google Scholar
Arce, J. and González Fernández, J. (eds.) 1988. Estudios sobre la ‘Tabula Siarensis’. Madrid.Google Scholar
Armstrong, D. 1986. ‘Stylistics and the date of Calpurnius Siculus’, Philologus 130, 113–36.Google Scholar
Arnason, J. P. and Raaflaub, K. A. (eds.) 2010. The Roman empire in context: historical and comparative perspectives. Malden, MA, and Oxford.Google Scholar
Ash, R. 1997. ‘Severed heads: individual portraits and irrational forces in Plutarch’s Galba and Otho’, in Mossman, J. (ed.) Plutarch and his intellectual world. Swansea: 189214.Google Scholar
Ash, R. 1999. Ordering anarchy: armies and leaders in Tacitus’ Histories. London.Google Scholar
Ash, R. 2008. ‘Standing in the shadows: Plutarch and the emperors in the Lives and Moralia’, in Nikolaides, A. (ed.) The unity of Plutarch’s work. Berlin: 557–75.Google Scholar
Ash, R. 2015. ‘At the end of the rainbow: Nero and Dido’s gold (Tacitus Annals 16.1–3),’ in Ash, R., Mossman, J., and Titchener, F. B. (eds.) Fame and infamy: essays for Christopher Pelling on characterization in Greek and Roman biography and historiography. Oxford: 269–84.Google Scholar
Ash, R. 2018. ‘Paradoxography and marvels in post-Domitianic literature: “an extraordinary affair; even in the hearing!”’, in König, A. and Whitton, C. (eds.) Roman literature under Nerva, Trajan and Hadrian: literary interactions, ad 96–138. Cambridge: 126–45.Google Scholar
Ash, R., Mossman, J., and Titchener, F. B. (eds.) 2015. Fame and infamy: essays for Christopher Pelling on characterization in Greek and Roman biography and historiography. Oxford.Google Scholar
Back, K. W. 1988. ‘Metaphors for public opinion in literature’, Public Opinion Quarterly 52, 278–88.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Baldry, H. C. 1952. ‘Who invented the golden age?’, Classical Quarterly 2, 8392.Google Scholar
Baldwin, B. 1979. ‘Juvenal’s Crispinus’, Acta Classica 22, 109–14.Google Scholar
Baldwin, B. 1995a. ‘Better late than early: reflections on the date of Calpurnius Siculus’, ICS 20, 157–67.Google Scholar
Baldwin, B. 1995b. ‘Roman emperors in the Elder Pliny’, Scholia: Studies in Classical Antiquity 4, 5678.Google Scholar
Balsdon, J. P. V. D. 1960. ‘Auctoritas, dignitas, otium’, Classical Quarterly 10, 4350.Google Scholar
Balmaceda, C. (ed.) 2020. Libertas and res publica in the Roman republic: ideas of freedom and Roman politics. Leiden.Google Scholar
Barnes, T. D. 1967. ‘Hadrian and Lucius Verus’, Journal of Roman Studies 57, 6579.Google Scholar
Barraclough, R. and Haase, W. 1984. ‘Philos’s politics: Roman rule and Hellenistic Judaism’, ANRW 2.21.1, 417553.Google Scholar
Barry, W. D. 2008. ‘Exposure, mutilation, and riot: violence at the Scalae Gemoniae in early imperial Rome’, G&R 55, 222–46.Google Scholar
Bartlett, R. 2020. Blood royal: dynastic politics in medieval Europe. Cambridge.Google Scholar
Barton, T. 1994. Power and knowledge: astrology, physiognomics, and medicine under the Roman empire. Ann Arbor, MI.Google Scholar
Bartsch, S. 1994. Actors in the audience: theatricality and doublespeak from Nero to Hadrian. Cambridge, MA, and London.Google Scholar
Bastomsky, S. J. 1969. ‘The Emperor Nero in Talmudic legend’, The Jewish Quarterly Review 59, 321–5.Google Scholar
Bauman, R. A. 1967. The crimen maiestatis in the Roman republic and Augustan principate. Johannesburg.Google Scholar
Bauman, R. A. 1974. Impietas in principem: a study of treason against the Roman emperor with special reference to the first century A.D. Munich.Google Scholar
Beagon, M. (ed.) 2005. The Elder Pliny on the human animal: Natural History book 7. Oxford.Google Scholar
Beagon, M. 2007. ‘Situating nature’s wonders in Pliny’s Natural History, in Bispham, E and Rowe, G. (eds.) Vita vigilia est: essays in honour of Barbara Levick. London: 1940.Google Scholar
Beard, M. 2003a. ‘The triumph of Flavius Josephus’, in Boyle, A. J. and Dominik, W. J. (eds.) Flavian Rome: culture, image, text. Leiden: 543–58.Google Scholar
Beard, M. 2003b. ‘The triumph of the absurd: Roman street theatre’, in Edwards, C. and Woolf, G. (eds.) Rome the cosmopolis. Cambridge: 2143.Google Scholar
Beard, M. 2007. The Roman triumph. Cambridge, MA, and London.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Beard, M. 2008. Pompeii: the life of a Roman town. London.Google Scholar
Beard, M. 2014. Laughter in ancient Rome: on joking, tickling, and cracking up. Berkeley, CA.Google Scholar
Beard, M. 2020. ‘How to be an emperor: re-reading Fergus Millar’s The Emperor in the Roman World’, The Times Literary Supplement, 24 July. www.the-tls.co.uk/articles/how-to-be-a-roman-emperor-essay-mary-beard/.Google Scholar
Beard, M., North, J., and Price, S. R. F. 1998. Religions of Rome. Cambridge.Google Scholar
Bénabou, M. 1976. La résistance africaine à la romanisation. Paris.Google Scholar
Benjamin, W. 1999. Illuminations. London.Google Scholar
Benson, L. 1967. ‘An approach to the scientific study of past public opinion’, Public Opinion Quarterly 31, 522–67.Google Scholar
Béranger, J. 1953. Recherches sur l’aspect idéologique du principat. Basel.Google Scholar
Béranger, J. 1973. Principatus: études de notions et d’histoire politiques dans l’Antiquité gréco-romaine. Geneva.Google Scholar
Berg, T. 2018. L’Hadrianus de Montserrat (P. Monts. Roca III, inv. 162–165): édition, traduction et analyse contextuelle d’un récit latin conservé sur papyrus. Liège.Google Scholar
Berger, A. 1953. ‘Encyclopedic dictionary of Roman law’, Transactions of the American Philological Association 43, 333808.Google Scholar
Bergmann, B. A. and Kondoleon, C. (eds.) 1999. The art of ancient spectacle. Washington, DC, and New Haven, CT.Google Scholar
Bickerman, E. J. 1973. ‘Consecratio’, in Boer, W. D. and Bickerman, E. J. (eds.) Le culte des souverains dans l’Empire Romain: sept exposés suivis de discussions. Geneva: 325.Google Scholar
Birley, A. 1999. Septimius Severus: the African emperor. London.Google Scholar
Bispham, E and Rowe, G. (eds.) 2007. Vita vigilia est: essays in honour of Barbara Levick. London.Google Scholar
Bodel, J. 2016. ‘Status dissonance and status dissidents in the equestrian order’, in Kuhn, A. B. (ed.) Social status and prestige in the Graeco-Roman world. Stuttgart: 2944.Google Scholar
Bodel, J., Bendlin, A., Bernard, S., Bruun, C., and Edmondson, J. 2019. ‘Notes on the elogium of a benefactor at PompeiiJournal of Roman Archaeology 32, 148–82.Google Scholar
Boer, W. D. and Bickerman, E. J. (eds.) 1973. Le culte des souverains dans l’Empire Romain: sept exposés suivis de discussions. Geneva.Google Scholar
Bonner, S. F. 1977. Education in ancient Rome: from the elder Cato to the younger Pliny. London.Google Scholar
Bonte, P. (ed.) 1994. Épouser au plus proche: inceste, prohibitions et stratégies matrimoniales autour de la Méditerranée. Paris.Google Scholar
Bossu, C. 1989. ‘L’objectif de l’institution alimentaire: essai d’évaluationLatomus 48, 372–82.Google Scholar
Bowersock, G. 1984. ‘Augustus and the East: the problem of the succession’, in Millar, F. and Segal, E. (eds.) Caesar Augustus: seven aspects. Oxford: 169–88.Google Scholar
Bowersock, G. 1987. ‘The mechanics of subversion in the Roman provinces’, in Giovannini, A. and Raaflaub, K. A. (eds.) Opposition et résistances à l’Empire d’Auguste à Trajan: neuf exposés suivis de discusssions. Geneva: 291320.Google Scholar
Bowersock, G. 1994. Fiction as history: Nero to Julian. Berkeley and London.Google Scholar
Bowes, K. 2021. ‘Tracking consumption at Pompeii: the graffiti lists’, Journal of Roman Archaeology 34, 552–84.Google Scholar
Boyle, A. J. (ed.) 2008. Octavia: attributed to Seneca. Oxford.Google Scholar
Boyle, A. J. and Dominik, W. J. (eds.) 2003. Flavian Rome: culture, image, text. Leiden.Google Scholar
Bradley, K. and Cartledge, P. (eds.) 2011. The Cambridge world history of slavery, vol. 1: the ancient Mediterranean world. Cambridge.Google Scholar
Braund, S. M. 1993. ‘Paradigms of power: Roman emperors in Roman satire’, in Cameron, K. (ed.) Humour and history. Oxford: 5669.Google Scholar
Braund, S. M. (ed.) 2009. Seneca: De clementia: text, translation and commentary. Oxford.Google Scholar
Braund, S. M. and James, P. 1998. ‘Quasi Homo: distortion and contortion in Seneca’s “Apocolocyntosis”’, Arethusa 31, 285311.Google Scholar
Brelich, A. (ed.) 1980. Perennitas: studi in onore di Angelo Brelich. Rome.Google Scholar
Brouwer, R. 2015. ‘Ulpian’s appeal to nature: Roman law as universal law’, The Legal History Review 83, 6076.Google Scholar
Brunt, P. 1977. ‘Lex de imperio Vespasiani’, Journal of Roman Studies 67, 95116.Google Scholar
Brunt, P. 1990. Roman imperial themes. Oxford.Google Scholar
Bruun, C. 2003. ‘Roman emperors in popular jargon: searching for contemporary nicknames (I)’, in de Blois, L., Erdkamp, P., Hekster, O., de Kleijn, G., and Mols, S. (eds.) The representation and perception of Roman imperial power. Amsterdam: 6998.Google Scholar
Bultrighini, I. 2021. ‘Calendars of the Greek east under Rome’, in Stern, S. (ed.) Calendars in the making: the origins of calendars from the Roman empire to the later Middle Ages. Leiden: 80128.Google Scholar
Bultrighini, I. and Stern, S. 2021. ‘The seven-day week in the Roman empire: origins, standardization, and diffusion’, in Stern, S. (ed.) Calendars in the making: the origins of calendars from the Roman empire to the later Middle Ages. Leiden: 1079.Google Scholar
Buongiorno, P. 2012. ‘Idee vecchie e nuove in tema di Lex de Imperio Vespasiani’, Athenaeum 100, 513–28.Google Scholar
Burke, P. 1978. Popular culture in early modern Europe. London.Google Scholar
Burrell, B. 2004. Neokoroi: Greek cities and Roman emperors. Leiden.Google Scholar
Buti, I. 1982. ‘La “cognitio extra ordinem”: da Augusto a Diocleziano,’ ANRW II.14, 2959.Google Scholar
Buttrey, T.V. 2007Domitian, the rhinoceros, and the date of Martial’s “Liber de Spectaculis”’, Journal of Roman Studies 97, 101–12.Google Scholar
Caballos Rufino, A. 2021. ‘Un Senadoconsulto del Año 14 d. C. en un epígrafe Bético’, Zeitschrift für Papyrologie und Epigraphik 219, 305–26.Google Scholar
Calomino, D. 2016. Defacing the past: damnation and desecration in imperial Rome. London.Google Scholar
Cameron, A. 1976. Circus factions: blues and greens at Rome and Byzantium. Oxford.Google Scholar
Cameron, K. (ed.) 1993. Humour and history. Oxford.Google Scholar
Campbell, J. B. 1984. The emperor and the Roman army, 31 bcad 235. Oxford.Google Scholar
Cannadine, D. and Price, S. R. F. (eds.) 1987. Rituals of royalty: power and ceremonial in traditional societies. Cambridge.Google Scholar
Carter, M. 2003. ‘Gladiatorial ranking and the “SC de Pretiis Gladiatorum Minuendis” (CIL II 6278 = ILS 5163)’, Phoenix 57, 83114.Google Scholar
Cauwenberghe, C. H.-V. 2008. ‘“Bons” et “Mauvais” empereurs en Achaïe au Premier Siècle de Notre Ère’, in Rizakis, A. D. and Camia, F. (eds.) Pathways to power: civic elites in the eastern part of the Roman Empire. Athens: 161–79.Google Scholar
Cébeillac-Gervasoni, M. and Lamoine, L. (eds.) 2003. Les élites et leurs facettes: les élites locales dans le monde hellénistique et romain. Rome.Google Scholar
Champlin, E. 1976. ‘Hadrian’s heir’, Zeitschrift für Papyrologie und Epigraphik 21, 7989.Google Scholar
Champlin, E. 1978. ‘The life and times of Calpurnius Siculus’, Journal of Roman Studies 68, 95110.Google Scholar
Champlin, E. 1986. ‘History and the date of Calpurnius Siculus’, Philologus 130, 104–12.Google Scholar
Champlin, E. 2003. Nero. Cambridge, MA, and London.Google Scholar
Champlin, E. 2005. ‘Phaedrus the Fabulous’, Journal of Roman Studies 95, 97123.Google Scholar
Champlin, E. 2008. ‘Tiberius the wise’, Historia 57, 408–25.Google Scholar
Champlin, E. 2012. ‘Seianus Augustus’, Chiron 42, 361–88.Google Scholar
Champlin, E. 2015a. ‘Mallonia’, Histos 9, 220–30.Google Scholar
Champlin, E. 2015b. ‘The richest man in Spain’, Zeitschrift für Papyrologie und Epigraphik 198, 277–95.Google Scholar
Charlesworth, M. P. 1937. The virtues of a Roman emperor: propaganda and the creation of belief. London.Google Scholar
Charlesworth, M. P. 1939. ‘The refusal of divine honours, an Augustan formula’, Papers of the British School at Rome 15, 110.Google Scholar
Christoforou, P. 2016. ‘Living in an age of gold: being a subject of the Roman emperor.’ Unpublished DPhil thesis, University of Oxford.Google Scholar
Christoforou, P. 2017. ‘“If he is worthy”: interactions between crowds and emperors in Plutarch and Tacitus’ accounts of ad69’, Rosetta 21, 116.Google Scholar
Christoforou, P. 2021. ‘“An indication of truly imperial manners”: the Roman emperor in Philo’s Legatio ad Gaium’, Historia 70, 83115.Google Scholar
Christoforou, P. 2022. ‘qualem diem Tiberius induisset: Tiberius’ absences on Capri as an inspiration for wonder and uncertainty’, in McNamara, J. and Pagán, V. E. (eds.) Tacitus’ wonders: empire and paradox in ancient Rome. London: 197220.Google Scholar
Chrysanthou, C. S. 2018. Plutarch’s parallel lives: narrative technique and moral judgement. Berlin.Google Scholar
Clarke, J. R. 2003. Art in the lives of ordinary Romans: visual representation and non-elite viewers in Italy, 100 bcad 315. Berkeley, CA.Google Scholar
Classen, C. J. 1991. ‘Virtutes imperatoriae’, Arctos: Acta Philologica Fennica 25, 1739.Google Scholar
Clavel-Lévêque, M. 1984. L’empire en jeux: espace symbolique et pratique sociale dans le monde romain. Paris.Google Scholar
Coarelli, F. 2001. ‘Les Saepta et la technique du vote à Rome de la fin de la République à Auguste’, Pallas 55, 3751.Google Scholar
Coleman, K. 1990. ‘Fatal charades: Roman executions staged as mythological enactments’, Journal of Roman Studies 80, 4473.Google Scholar
Coleman, K. M. 1993. ‘Launching into history: aquatic displays in the early empire’, Journal of Roman Studies 83, 4874.Google Scholar
Coleman, K. M. (ed.) 2006. M. Valerii Martialis Liber spectaculorum: introduction, translation and commentary. Oxford.Google Scholar
Cooley, A. (ed.) 2009. Res gestae divi Augusti: text, translation, and commentary. Cambridge.Google Scholar
Cooley, A. 2019. ‘From the Augustan Principate to the invention of the age of Augustus’, Journal of Roman Studies 109, 7187.Google Scholar
Corbier, M. 1991. ‘Divorce and adoption as Roman familial strategies (le divorce et l’adoption “en plus”)’, in Rawson, B. (ed.) Marriage, divorce, and children in ancient Rome. Oxford: 4778.Google Scholar
Corbier, M. 1994a. ‘À propos de la Tabula Siarensis: le Sénat, Germanicus et la domus Augusta’, in González Fernández, J. (ed.) Roma y las provincias: realidad administrativa e ideología imperial. Madrid: 3985.Google Scholar
Corbier, M. 1994b. ‘La maison des Césars’, in Bonte, P. (ed.) Épouser au plus proche: inceste, prohibitions et stratégies matrimoniales autour de la Méditerranée. Paris: 213–91.Google Scholar
Corbier, M. 1995. ‘Male power and legitimacy through women: the Domus Augusta under the Julio-Claudians’, in Hawley, R. and Levick, B. (eds.) Women in antiquity: new assessments. London: 178–93.Google Scholar
Cornwell, H. 2017. Pax and the politics of peace: republic to principate. Oxford.Google Scholar
Cortés Copete, J. M. 2017. ‘Hadrian among the Gods’, in Muñiz Grijalvo, E., Cortés Copete, J. M., and Lozano Gomez, F. (eds.) Empire and religion: religious change in Greek cities under Roman rule. Leiden: 112–36.Google Scholar
Cotton, H. 1993. ‘The guardianship of Jesus Son of Babatha: Roman and local law in the province of Arabia’, Journal of Roman Studies 83, 94108.Google Scholar
Courrier, C. 2014. La plèbe de Rome et sa culture (fin du IIe siècle av. J.-C. – fin du siècle ap. J.-C. Rome.Google Scholar
Courtney, E. (ed.) 2013. A commentary on the satires of Juvenal. Berkeley, CA.Google Scholar
Cowan, E. 2019. ‘Hopes and aspirations: res publica, leges et iura, and alternatives at Rome’, in Morrell, K., Osgood, J., and Welch, K. (eds.) The alternative Augustan age. Oxford: 2745Google Scholar
Czajkowski, K., Eckhardt, B. and Strothmann, M. (eds.) 2020. Law in the Roman provinces. Oxford.Google Scholar
Dalla Rosa, A. 2021. ‘The provincia of Augustus, or how to reconcile Cassius Dio’s vision of the principate, Augustus’ own public image and early imperial institutional practices’, in Díaz Fernández, A. (ed.) Provinces and provincial command in republican Rome: genesis, development and governance. Zaragoza: 191216.Google Scholar
Darwall-Smith, R. 1996. Emperors and architecture: a study of Flavian Rome. Brussels.Google Scholar
Davenport, C. 2019. A history of the Roman equestrian order. Cambridge.Google Scholar
Davenport, C. 2020. ‘Roman emperors, conquest, and violence: images from the eastern provinces’, in Russell, A. and Hellström, M. (eds.) The social dynamics of Roman imperial imagery. Cambridge: 100–27.Google Scholar
Davenport, C. 2021. ‘News, rumour, and the political culture of the Roman imperial monarchy in the Roman history’, in Davenport, C. and Mallan, C. (eds.) Emperors and political culture in Cassius Dio’s Roman history. Cambridge: 5273.Google Scholar
Davenport, C. and Mallan, C. 2014. ‘Hadrian’s adoption speech in Cassius Dio’s Roman History and the problems of imperial succession’, American Journal of Philology 135, 637–68.Google Scholar
Davenport, C. and Mallan, C. (eds.) 2021. Emperors and political culture in Cassius Dio’s Roman history. Cambridge.Google Scholar
Davies, P. J. E. 2010. Death and the emperor: Roman imperial funerary monuments from Augustus to Marcus Aurelius. Austin, TX.Google Scholar
de Angelis, F. 2021a. ‘Decoration and attention in the forum of Augustus: the agency of ancient imagery between ritual and routine’, in Haug, A. and Lauritsen, M. T. (eds.) Principles of decoration in the Roman world. Berlin: 1532.Google Scholar
de Angelis, F. (ed.) 2021b. Emperors in images, architecture, and ritual. Boston, MA.Google Scholar
de Blois, L. (ed.) 2001. Administration, prosopography and appointment policies in the Roman empire. Leiden.Google Scholar
de Blois, L., Erdkamp, P., Hekster, O. de Kleijn, G., and Mols, S. (eds.) 2003. The representation and perception of Roman imperial power. Amsterdam.Google Scholar
de Coulanges, F. 1891. Histoire des institutions politiques de l’ancienne France: la Gaule romaine. Paris.Google Scholar
de Jong, J. 2003. ‘Representation and perception of Roman imperial power in Greek papyrus texts from ad 238’, in de Blois, L., Erdkamp, P., Hekster, O., de Kleijn, G., and Mols, S. (eds.) The representation and perception of Roman imperial power. Amsterdam: 269–81.Google Scholar
de Pury-Gysel, A. 2017. Die Goldbüste des Septimius Severus: Gold-und Silberbüsten römischer Kaiser. Basel and Frankfurt.Google Scholar
de Pury-Gysel, A. 2019. ‘The gold bust (imago) of Septimius Severus from Didymoteicho (Plotinopolis)’, Journal of Roman Archaeology 32, 313–28.Google Scholar
de Ste. Croix, G. E. M. 1981. The class struggle in the ancient Greek world: from the archaic age to the Arab conquests. London.Google Scholar
Dench, E. 2005. Romulus’ asylum: Roman identities from the age of Alexander to the age of Hadrian. Oxford.Google Scholar
Dench, E. 2018. Empire and political cultures in the Roman world. Cambridge.Google Scholar
Desmond, W. D. 2020. Hegel’s antiquity. Oxford.Google Scholar
Díaz Fernández, A. (ed.) 2021. Provinces and provincial command in republican Rome: genesis, development and governance. Zaragoza.Google Scholar
Dickey, E. 2001. ‘Kypie, ΔΕΣΠΟΤΑ, Domine Greek politeness in the Roman empire’, Journal of Hellenic Studies 121, 111.Google Scholar
Dickey, E. 2012. The colloquia of the hermeneumata pseudodositheana. Cambridge.Google Scholar
Dickison, S. K. 1977. ‘Claudius: Saturnalicius princeps’, Latomus 36, 634–47.Google Scholar
Dmitriev, S. 2005. City government in Hellenistic and Roman Asia minor. Oxford.Google Scholar
Dolganov, A. 2018. ‘Empire of law: legal culture and imperial rule in the Roman province of Egypt’. Unpublished PhD Dissertation, Princeton.Google Scholar
Döpp, S. (ed.) 1993. Karnevaleske Phänomene in antiken und nachantiken Kulturen und Literaturen. Trier.Google Scholar
Drinkwater, J. F. 2013. ‘Nero Caesar and the half-baked principate’, in Gibson, A. G. G. (ed.) The Julio-Claudian succession: reality and perception of the “Augustan model”. Leiden: 155–73.Google Scholar
Drinkwater, J. F. 2019. Nero: emperor and court. Cambridge.Google Scholar
Drogula, F. K. 2007. ‘Imperium, potestas, and the pomerium in the Roman Republic’, Historia 56, 419–52.Google Scholar
du Plessis, P., Ando, C., and Tuori, K. (eds.) 2016. The Oxford handbook of Roman law and society. Oxford.Google Scholar
du Quesnay, I. M. L. M. 1976. ‘Vergil’s fourth Eclogue’, Liverpool Latin Seminar 1, 2599.Google Scholar
Duindam, J. F. J. 2016. Dynasties: a global history of power, 1300–1800. Cambridge.Google Scholar
Dunbabin, K. M. D. 2003. The Roman banquet: images of conviviality. Cambridge.Google Scholar
Duncan-Jones, R. 1964. ‘The purpose and organisation of the alimenta’, Papers of the British School at Rome 32, 123–46.Google Scholar
Duncan-Jones, R. 1974. The economy of the Roman empire: quantitative studies. Cambridge.Google Scholar
Eck, W., Schneider, D. L., and Takács, S. A. 2003. The age of Augustus. Malden, MA, and Oxford.Google Scholar
Edmonson, J. C. 1996. ‘Dynamic arenas: gladiatorial presentations in the city of Rome and the construction of Roman society during the early empire’, in Slater, W. J. (ed.) Roman theater and society: E. Togo Salmon papers I. Ann Arbor: 69112.Google Scholar
Edwards, C. 1993. The politics of immorality in ancient Rome. Cambridge.Google Scholar
Edwards, C. and Woolf, G. (eds.) 2003. Rome the cosmopolis. Cambridge.Google Scholar
Edwards, M. J. and Swain, S. (eds.) 1997. Portraits: biographical representation in the Greek and Latin literature of the Roman Empire. Oxford.Google Scholar
Edwards, R. 2011. ‘Tacitus, Tiberius and Capri’, Latomus 70, 1047–57.Google Scholar
Edwards, R. 2015. ‘Caesar telling tales: Phaedrus and Tiberius’, Rheinisches Museum 158, 167–84.Google Scholar
Elkins, N. T. 2017. ‘Aequitas and Iustitia on the coinage of Nerva: a case of visual panegyric’, Numismatic Chronicle 177, 93106.Google Scholar
Evêque, R. 2018. ‘Chronique d’un mort-vivant: mise en altérité et devenir de l’homo sacer romain’, Droit et cultures: Revue internationale interdisciplinaire 76, 3183.Google Scholar
Ewald, B. C. and Noreña, C. F. (eds.) 2010. The emperor and Rome: space, representation, and ritual. Cambridge.Google Scholar
Fasolt, C. 2004. The limits of history. Chicago and London.Google Scholar
Fears, J. R. 1981. ‘The cult of virtues and Roman imperial ideology’, ANRW II.17.2: 828948.Google Scholar
Feeney, D. 2007. Caesar’s calendar: ancient time and the beginnings of history. Berkeley, CA.Google Scholar
Feeney, D. C. 1992. ‘Si licet et fas est: Ovid’s Fasti and the problem of free speech under the principate’, in Powell, A. (ed.) Roman poetry and propaganda in the age of Augustus. London: 125.Google Scholar
Feig Vishnia, R. 2012. Roman elections in the age of Cicero: society, government, and voting. New York.Google Scholar
Ferri, R. 2003. Octavia: a play attributed to Seneca. Cambridge.Google Scholar
Fiori, R. 1996. Homo sacer: dinamica politico-costituzionale di una sanzione giuridico-religiosa. Naples.Google Scholar
Fishwick, D. 1987–2005. The imperial cult in the Latin West: studies in the ruler cult of the western provinces of the Roman empire. 4 vols. Leiden.Google Scholar
Flach, D. 1976. ‘Destinatio und nominatio im frühen Prinzipat’, Chiron 6, 193204.Google Scholar
Flaig, E. 2010. ‘How the Emperor Nero lost acceptance in Rome’, in Ewald, B. C. and Noreña, C. F. (eds.) The emperor and Rome: space, representation, and ritual. Cambridge: 275–88.Google Scholar
Flaig, E. 2011. ‘The transition from republic to principate: loss of legitimacy, revolution, and acceptance’, in Arnason, J. P. and Raaflaub, K. A. (eds.) The Roman empire in context: historical and comparative perspectives. Malden, MA, and Oxford: 6784.Google Scholar
Flaig, E. 2019. Den Kaiser herausfordern: die Usurpation im Römischen Reich. 2nd ed. Frankfurt.Google Scholar
Flower, H. I. 1995. ‘Fabulae Praetextae in context: when were plays on contemporary subjects performed in Republican Rome?’, Classical Quarterly 45, 170–90.Google Scholar
Flower, H. I. 1996. Ancestor masks and aristocratic power in Roman culture. Oxford.Google Scholar
Flower, H. I. 2006. The art of forgetting: disgrace and oblivion in Roman political culture. Chapel Hill, NC, and London.Google Scholar
Flower, H. I. 2010. Roman republics. Princeton, NJ.Google Scholar
Flower, H. I. 2017. The dancing lares and the serpent in the garden: religion at the Roman street corner. Princeton, NJ.Google Scholar
Flower, H. I. 2020. ‘Augustus, Tiberius, and the end of the Roman triumph’, Classical Antiquity 39, 128.Google Scholar
Forbis, E. 1996. Municipal virtues in the Roman empire: the evidence of Italian honorary inscriptions. Stuttgart.Google Scholar
Forsdyke, S. 2012. Slaves tell tales: and other episodes in the politics of popular culture in ancient Greece. Princeton, NJ.Google Scholar
Fowler, W. W. 1911. ‘The original meaning of the word sacer’, Journal of Roman Studies 1, 5763.Google Scholar
Franklin, J. L. 2001. Pompeis difficile est: studies in the political life of imperial Pompeii. Ann Arbor, MI.Google Scholar
Freudenburg, K. 2014. ‘Recusatio as political theatre: Horace’s letter to Augustus’, Journal of Roman Studies 104, 105–32.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Friesen, S. J. 1993. Twice Neokoros: Ephesus, Asia, and the cult of the Flavian imperial family. Leiden.Google Scholar
Fujii, T. 2013. Imperial cult and imperial representation in Roman Cyprus. Stuttgart.Google Scholar
Furedi, F. 2013. Authority: a sociological history. Cambridge.Google Scholar
Gabba, E. 1981. ‘True history and false history in classical antiquity’, Journal of Roman Studies 71, 5062.Google Scholar
Gagé, J. 1933. ‘La théologie de la 18 dminist impériale’, Revue historique 171, 143.Google Scholar
Gale, M. and Scourfield, J. H. D. (eds.) 2018. Texts and violence in the Roman world. Cambridge.Google Scholar
Galinsky, K. (ed.) 2014. Memoria Romana: memory in Rome and Rome in memory. Ann Arbor, MI.Google Scholar
Galinsky, K. 2015a. ‘Augustus’ Auctoritas and Res Gestae 34.3’, Hermes 143, 244–9.Google Scholar
Galinsky, K. 2015b. Memory in ancient Rome and early Christianity. Oxford.Google Scholar
Galinsky, K. and Lapatin, K. (eds.) 2016. Cultural memories in the Roman empire. Los Angeles, CA.Google Scholar
Garland, R. 1995. The eye of the beholder: deformity and disability in the Graeco-Roman world. London.Google Scholar
Garnsey, P. and Whittaker, C. R. (eds.) 1978. Imperialism in the ancient world. Cambridge.Google Scholar
Gartrell, A. 2021. The cult of Castor and Pollux in ancient Rome. Cambridge.Google Scholar
Gatz, B. 1967. Weltalter, goldene Zeit and sinnverwandte Vorstellungen. Hildesheim.Google Scholar
George, M. 2011. ‘Roman slavery and Roman material culture’, in Bradley, K. and Cartledge, P. (eds.) The Cambridge world history of slavery, vol. 1: the ancient Mediterranean world. Cambridge: 385413.Google Scholar
Gibson, A. G. G. (ed.) 2013. The Julio-Claudian succession: reality and perception of the “Augustan model”. Leiden.Google Scholar
Gibson, B. J. 2018. ‘Tacitus and the language of violence’, in Gale, M. and Scourfield, J. H. D. (eds.) Texts and violence in the Roman world. Cambridge: 269–85.Google Scholar
Gil, J. and Torallas Tovar, S. (eds.) 2010. Hadrianus. P.Monts. Roca III. Barcelona.Google Scholar
Giovannini, A. and Raaflaub, K. A. (eds.) 1987. Opposition et résistances à l’Empire d’Auguste à Trajan: neuf exposés suivis de discusssions. Geneva.Google Scholar
Giradet, K. M. 2000. ‘“Imperium maius”: politische und verfassungsrechtliche Aspekte. Versuch einer Klärung’, in Millar, F. and Giovannini, A. (eds.) La révolution romaine après Ronald Syme: bilans et perspectives. Geneva: 167236.Google Scholar
Giusti, E. 2016. ‘Did somebody say Augustan totalitarianism? Duncan Kennedy’s “reflections,” Hannah Arendt’s Origins, and the continental divide over Virgil’s Aeneid,’ Dictynna: revue de poétique latine 13. https://doi.org/10.4000/dictynna.1282.Google Scholar
Gladhill, B. 2012. ‘The emperor’s no clothes: Suetonius and the dynamics of corporeal ecphrasis’, Classical Antiquity 31, 315–48.Google Scholar
Gleason, M. 2011. ‘Identity theft: doubles and masquerades in Cassius Dio’s contemporary history’, Classical Antiquity 30, 3386.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
González Fernández, J. (ed.) 1994. Roma y las provincias: realidad 20 dministrative e ideología imperial. Madrid.Google Scholar
Gradel, I. 2002. Emperor worship and Roman religion. Oxford.Google Scholar
Gray, E. W. 1970. ‘The Imperium of M. Agrippa: a note on P. Colon. Inv. Nr. 4701’, Zeitschrift für Papyrologie und Epigraphik 6, 227–38.Google Scholar
Greensmith, E. 2018. ‘When Homer quotes Callimachus: allusive poetics in the proem of the Posthomerica’, Classical Quarterly 68, 257–74.Google Scholar
Greensmith, E. 2020. The resurrection of Homer in imperial Greek epic: Quintus Smyrnaeus’ Posthomerica and the poetics of impersonation. Cambridge.Google Scholar
Greensmith, E. 2021. ‘Beginning at the end in imperial Greek epic’, Arethusa 54, 379-97.Google Scholar
Greensmith, E. 2022. ‘The wrath of the sibyl: Homeric reception and contested identities in the Sibylline Oracles 3’, in König, J. and Wiater, N. (eds.) Late Hellenistic Greek literature in dialogue. Cambridge: 178201.Google Scholar
Griffin, M. T. 1991. ‘Urbs Roma, plebs and princeps’, in Alexander, L. (ed.) Images of empire. Sheffield: 1946.Google Scholar
Grubbs, J. E. (ed.) 2002. Women and the law in the Roman empire: a sourcebook on marriage, divorce and widowhood. London.Google Scholar
Gruen, E. S. 1974. The last generation of the Roman republic. Berkeley, CA.Google Scholar
Gruen, E. S. 2002. Diaspora: Jews amidst Greeks and Romans. Cambridge, MA, and London.Google Scholar
Gruen, E. S. 2012. ‘Caligula, the imperial cult, and Philo’s Legatio’, Studia Philonica Annual, 24, 135–47.Google Scholar
Gruen, E .S. 2014. ‘Nero in the Sibylline Oracles’, Scripta Classica Israelica 33, 87-98.Google Scholar
Gruen, E. S. 2020. ‘The Sibylline Oracles and resistance to Rome’, in Price, J. J. and Berthelot, K. (eds.) The future of Rome: Roman, Greek, Jewish and Christian visions. Cambridge: 189205.Google Scholar
Grünewald, T. 2004. Bandits in the Roman empire: myth and reality. London.Google Scholar
Gunderson, E. 2003. ‘The Flavian Amphitheatre: all the world as stage’, in Boyle, A. J. and Dominik, W. J. (eds.) Flavian Rome: culture, image, text. Leiden: 637–58.Google Scholar
Gygax, M. D. and Zuiderhoek, A. (eds.) 2021. Benefactors and the polis: the public gift in the Greek cities from the Homeric world to late antiquity. Cambridge.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Habermas, J. 1989. The structural transformation of the public sphere: an inquiry into a category of bourgeois society. Cambridge, MA.Google Scholar
Hall, U. 1998. ‘“Species libertatis”: voting procedure in the late Roman republic’, Bulletin of the Institute of Classical Studies 42, 1530.Google Scholar
Hammond, M. 1956. ‘The transmission of powers of the Roman emperor from the death of Nero in ad 68 to that of Severus Alexander in ad 235’, Memoirs of the American Academy in Rome, 24, 63133.Google Scholar
Hammond, M. 1959. The Antonine monarchy. Rome.Google Scholar
Hammond, M. 1968. The Augustan principate in theory and practice during the Julio-Claudian period. New York.Google Scholar
Hannah, R. 2005. Greek and Roman calendars: constructions of time in the classical world. London.Google Scholar
Hardie, P. R. 2002. Ovid’s poetics of illusion. Cambridge.Google Scholar
Harker, A. 2008. Loyalty and dissidence in Roman Egypt: the case of the Acta Alexandrinorum. Cambridge.Google Scholar
Harland, P. A. 2003. ‘Imperial cults within local cultural life: associations in Roman Asia’, AHB 17, 85107.Google Scholar
Harlow, M. and Laurence, R. 2017. ‘Augustus senex: old age and the remaking of the Principate’, Greece & Rome 64, 115–31.Google Scholar
Harries, J. 2003. ‘Favor Populi: pagans, Christians and public entertainment in late antique Italy’, in Lomas, K. and Cornell, T. (eds.) Bread and circuses: euergetism and municipal patronage in Roman Italy. London: 125–41.Google Scholar
Harris, E. H. and Canevaro, M. (eds.) 2015. The Oxford handbook of ancient Greek law. Oxford.Google Scholar
Haug, A. and Lauritsen, M. T. (eds.) 2021. Principles of decoration in the Roman world. Berlin.Google Scholar
Hauken, T. 1998. Petition and response: an epigraphic study of petitions to Roman emperors, 181–249. Bergen.Google Scholar
Hawley, R. and Levick, B. (eds.) 1995. Women in antiquity: new assessments. London.Google Scholar
Hazirlayanlar, Y., Takmer, B., Arca, E. N. A., and Özdil, N. G. (eds.) 2016. Vir Doctus Anatolicus: studies in memory of Sencer Sahin. Istanbul.Google Scholar
Hegel, G. W. F. 2004. Lectures on the philosophy of history. Trans. J. Sibtree. Mineola, NY.Google Scholar
Hekster, O. 2001. ‘All in the family: the appointment of emperors designate in the second century ad’, in de Blois, L. (ed.) Administration, prosopography and appointment policies in the Roman empire. Leiden: 3549.Google Scholar
Hekster, O. 2002. Commodus: an emperor at the crossroads. Amsterdam.Google Scholar
Hekster, O. 2015. Emperors and ancestors: Roman rulers and the constraints of tradition. Oxford.Google Scholar
Hekster, O. 2017. ‘Identifying tradition: Augustus and the constraint of formulating sole rule’, Politica Antica 7, 4760.Google Scholar
Hekster, O. 2020. ‘Imperial justice? The absence of images of Roman emperors in a legal role’, Classical Quarterly 70, 247–60.Google Scholar
Hekster, O. 2023. Caesar rules: the emperor in the changing Roman world (c. 50 bcad 565). Cambridge.Google Scholar
Hellström, M. 2020. ‘Local aspirations and statues of emperors in North Africa’, in Russell, A. and Hellström, M. (eds.) The social dynamics of Roman imperial imagery. Cambridge: 159–79.Google Scholar
Hellström, M. and Russell, A. 2020. ‘Introduction’, in Russell, A. and Hellström, M. (eds.) The social dynamics of Roman imperial imagery. Cambridge: 124.Google Scholar
Henderson, J. 2001. Telling tales on Caesar: Roman stories from Phaedrus. Oxford.Google Scholar
Henderson, J. 2002. ‘Knowing someone through their books: Pliny on Uncle Pliny (“Epistles” 3.5)’, Classical Philology 97, 256–84.Google Scholar
Henrichs, A. 1968. ‘Vespasian’s visit to Alexandria’, Zeitschrift für Papyrologie und Epigraphik 3, 5180.Google Scholar
Herklotz, F. 2007. Prinzeps und Pharao: der Kult des Augustus in Ägypten. Frankfurt.Google Scholar
Herz, P. 2005. ‘Caesar and God: recent publications on Roman imperial cult’, Journal of Roman Archaeology 18, 638–48.Google Scholar
Herz, P. 2007. ‘Emperors: caring for the empire and their successors’, in Rüpke, J. (ed.) A companion to Roman religion. Oxford: 304–16.Google Scholar
Herz, Z. 2020. ‘Precedential reasoning and dynastic self-fashioning in the rescripts of Severus Alexander’, Historia 69, 103–25.Google Scholar
Hobsbawm, E. J. 1972. Bandits. Harmondsworth.Google Scholar
Hodgson, L. 2017. Res publica and the Roman republic: ‘without body or form’. Oxford.Google Scholar
Hölkeskamp, K.-J. 2010. Reconstructing the Roman republic: an ancient political culture and modern research. Princeton, NJ.Google Scholar
Honoré, T. 1994. Emperors and lawyers. Oxford.Google Scholar
Hopkins, K. 1978a. Conquerors and slaves. Cambridge.Google Scholar
Hopkins, K. 1978b. ‘Rules of evidence’, Journal of Roman Studies 68, 178–86.Google Scholar
Horden, P. and Purcell, N. 2000. The corrupting sea: a study of Mediterranean history. Oxford.Google Scholar
Horsfall, N. 1997. ‘Criteria for the dating of Calpurnius Siculus’, Rivista di filologia e di istruzione classica 125, 166–95.Google Scholar
Horsfall, N. 2003. The culture of the Roman plebs. London.Google Scholar
Houston, G. W. 1992. ‘What uses might Roman farmers have made of the loans they received in the Alimenta program’, Rivista Storica dell’Antichità 22, 97105.Google Scholar
Howgego, C. J. 2005. ‘Coinage and identity in the Roman provinces’, in Howgego, C. J., Heuchert, V., and Burnett, A. (eds.) Coinage and identity in the Roman provinces. Oxford: 117.Google Scholar
Howgego, C. J., Heuchert, V., and Burnett, A. (eds.) 2005. Coinage and identity in the Roman provinces. Oxford.Google Scholar
Huet, V. 2004. ‘Images et damnatio memoriae’, Cahiers du Centre Gustave Glotz 15, 237–53.Google Scholar
Hurlet, F. 1997. Les collègues du prince sous Auguste et Tibère: de la légalité républicaine à la légitimité dynastique. Rome.Google Scholar
Hurlet, F. 2001. ‘Les auspices d’Octavien/Auguste’, Cahiers du Centre Gustave Glotz, 12, 155–80.Google Scholar
Hurlet, F. 2020. ‘The Auctoritas and Libertas of Augustus: metamorphosis of the Roman Res Publica, in Balmaceda, C., (ed.) Libertas and res publica in the Roman republic: ideas of freedom and Roman politics. Leiden: 170–88.Google Scholar
Hurlet, F. and Mineo, B. (eds.) 2009. Le principat d’Auguste: réalités et représentations du pouvoir autour de la res publica restituta. Rennes.Google Scholar
Israelowich, I. 2012. Society, medicine and religion in the sacred tales of Aelius Aristides. Leiden.Google Scholar
Jacques, F., Scheid, J., and Lepelley, C. 1990. Rome et l’intégration de l’Empire: 44 av. J.-C.-260 apr. J.-C. Paris.Google Scholar
Jasnow, B. 2015. ‘Germanicus, Nero and the Incognito King in Tacitus’ Annals 2.13 and 13.25’, Classical Journal 110, 313–31.Google Scholar
Jehne, M. 1995. Demokratie in Rom? die Rolle des Volkes in der Politik der römischen Republik. Stuttgart.Google Scholar
Johnston, A. C. 2017. The sons of Remus: identity in Roman Gaul and Spain. Cambridge, MA.Google Scholar
Jones, C. 2000. ‘The emperor and the giant’, Classical Philology 95, 476–81.Google Scholar
Jones, C. P. 2001. ‘The Claudian Monument at Patara’, Zeitschrift für Papyrologie und Epigraphik 137, 161–8.Google Scholar
Jones, K. R. 2011. Jewish reactions to the destruction of Jerusalem in A.D. 70: apocalypses and related pseudepigrapha. Leiden and Boston, MA.Google Scholar
Jördens, A. 2020. ‘Aequmm et iustum: on dealing with the law in the province of Egypt’, in Czajkowski, K., Eckhardt, B., and Strothmann, M. (eds.) Law in the Roman provinces. Oxford: 1931.Google Scholar
Kahane, A. 2022. ‘Homer and ancient narrative time’, Classical Antiquity 41, 150.Google Scholar
Kajanto, I. 1981. ‘Fortuna’, ANRW, II.17.1, 502–58.Google Scholar
Kaldellis, A. 2015. The Byzantine republic: people and power in New Rome. Cambridge, MA.Google Scholar
Kantiréa, M. 2008. ‘Le culte impérial à Chypre: relecture des documents épigraphiquesZeitschrift für Papyrologie und Epigraphik 167, 91112.Google Scholar
Kantiréa, M. 2014. ‘Reconstituer l’histoire grecque sous l’Empire: à propos de l’asile au temps de Tibère (Tacite, Annales 3, 60–64 et 4, 14, 1–2)’, Latomus 73, 415–38.Google Scholar
Kantor, G. 2013. ‘Law in Roman Phrygia: rules and jurisdictions’, in Thonemann, P. (ed.) Roman Phrygia: culture and society. Cambridge: 143–67.Google Scholar
Kantor, G. 2015. ‘Greek law under the Romans’, in Harris, E. H. and Canevaro, M. (eds.) The Oxford handbook of ancient Greek law. Oxford: 125.Google Scholar
Kantor, G. 2020. ‘Navigating Roman law and local privileges in Pontus-Bithynia’, in Czajkowski, K., Eckhardt, B., and Strothmann, M. (eds.) Law in the Roman provinces. Oxford: 185209.Google Scholar
Kantorowicz, E. H. 1997. The king’s two bodies. Princeton, NJ.Google Scholar
Kaster, R. A. 2016. Studies on the text of Suetonius’ De uita Caesarum. Oxford.Google Scholar
Kelly, G. 2013a. ‘Pliny and Symmachus’, Arethusa 46, 261–87.Google Scholar
Kelly, G. 2013b. ‘The political crisis of ad 375–376’, Chiron 43, 357410.Google Scholar
Kemezis, A. M. 2014. Greek narratives of the Roman empire under the Severans: Cassius Dio, Philostratus and Herodian. Cambridge.Google Scholar
Kemezis, A. M. 2021. ‘Vox populi, vox mea? Information, evaluation and public opinion in Dio’s account of the principate’, in Davenport, C. and Mallan, C. (eds.) Emperors and political culture in Cassius Dio’s Roman history. Cambridge: 3351.Google Scholar
Kneebone, E. 2020. Oppian’s Halieutica: charting a didactic epic. Cambridge.Google Scholar
Kokkinos, N. 1993. The Herodian dynasty: origins, role in society and eclipse (2nd century bc to 2nd century ad). Sheffield.Google Scholar
König, A., Langlands, R., and Uden, J. (eds.) 2020. Literature and culture in the Roman empire 96–235: cross-cultural interactions. Cambridge.Google Scholar
König, A. and Whitton, C. (eds.) 2018. Roman literature under Nerva, Trajan and Hadrian: literary interactions, ad 96–138. Cambridge.Google Scholar
König, J. and Wiater, N. (eds.) 2022. Late Hellenistic Greek literature in dialogue. Cambridge.Google Scholar
Kornemann, E. 1930. Doppelprinzipat und Reichsteilung im Imperium Romanum. Leipzig and Berlin.Google Scholar
Kosmin, P. J. 2018. Time and its adversaries in the Seleucid empire. Cambridge, MA, and London.Google Scholar
Kragelund, P. 1982. Prophecy, populism, and propaganda in the Octavia. Copenhagen.Google Scholar
Kragelund, P. 2002. ‘Historical drama in ancient Rome: republican flourishing and imperial decline’, Symbolae Osloenses 77, 551.Google Scholar
Kristensen, T. M. 2013. Making and breaking the Gods: Christian responses to pagan sculpture in late antiquity. Aarhus.Google Scholar
Kröss, K. 2017. Die politische Rolle der stadtrömischen Plebs in der Kaiserzeit. Leiden.Google Scholar
Kruse, M. 2019. The politics of Roman memory: from the fall of the Western empire to the age of Justinian. Philadelphia, PA.Google Scholar
Kugelmeier, C. 2019. ‘The interaction between ‘history’ and ‘story’ in Roman historiography: the rhetorical construction of the historical image of Nero’, Church, Communication and Culture 4, 255–65.Google Scholar
Kuhn, A. B. (ed.) 2016. Social status and prestige in the Graeco-Roman world. Stuttgart.Google Scholar
Kuhn, C. T. (ed.) 2012a. Politische Kommunikation und öffentliche Meinung in der antiken Welt. Stuttgart.Google Scholar
Kuhn, C. T. 2012b. ‘Politische Kommunikation und Öffentliche Meinung in der Antike Welt: Einleitende Bemerkungen’, in Kuhn, C. T. (ed.) Politische Kommunikation und öffentliche Meinung in der antiken Welt. Stuttgart: 1130.Google Scholar
Kurke, L. 2011. Aesopic conversations: popular tradition, cultural dialogue, and the invention of Greek prose. Princeton, NJ and Oxford.Google Scholar
Kuttner, A. L. 1995. Dynasty and empire in the age of Augustus: the case of the Boscoreale Cups. Berkeley, CA, and Oxford.Google Scholar
Lange, C. H. 2019. ‘For Rome or for Augustus? Triumphs beyond the imperial family in the post-civil-war period’, in Morrell, K., Osgood, J., and Welch, K. (eds.) The alternative Augustan age. Oxford: 113–29.Google Scholar
Laurence, R. and Paterson, J. 1999. ‘Power and laughter: imperial dicta’, Papers of the British School at Rome 67, 183–97.Google Scholar
Lauro, M. G. (ed.) 1998. Castelporziano III: campagne di scavo e restauro 1987–1991. Rome.Google Scholar
Lavan, M. 2013. Slaves to Rome: paradigms of empire in Roman culture. Cambridge.Google Scholar
Lavan, M. 2016. ‘The spread of Roman citizenship, 14–212 CE: quantification in the face of high uncertainty’, Past & Present 230, 346.Google Scholar
Lavan, M. 2018. ‘Pliny Epistles 10 and imperial correspondence: the empire of letters’, in König, A. and Whitton, C. (eds.) Roman literature under Nerva, Trajan and Hadrian: literary interactions, ad 96–138. Cambridge: 280301.Google Scholar
Lavan, M. 2019. ‘The army and the spread of Roman citizenship’, Journal of Roman Studies 109, 1769.Google Scholar
Lavan, M. 2020. ‘Beyond Romans and others: identities in the long second century’, in König, A., Langlands, R., and Uden, J. (eds.) Literature and culture in the Roman empire 96–235: cross-cultural interactions. Cambridge: 3757.Google Scholar
Leigh, M. 2013. From polypragmon to curiosus: ancient concepts of curious and meddlesome behaviour. Oxford.Google Scholar
Lendon, J. E. 1997. Empire of honour: the art of government in the Roman world. Oxford.Google Scholar
Lenski, N. 2016. Constantine and the cities: imperial authority and civic politics. Philadelphia, PA.Google Scholar
Leon, D. W. 2021. Arrian the historian: writing the Greek past in the Roman empire. Austin, TX.Google Scholar
Levick, B. 1967. ‘Imperial control of the elections under the early principate: commendatio, suffragatio, and nominatio’, Historia 16, 207–30.Google Scholar
Levick, B. 1975. ‘Primus, Murena, and “Fides”: notes on Cassius Dio LIV.3’, Greece & Rome 22, 156–63.Google Scholar
Levick, B. 1990. Claudius. London.Google Scholar
Levick, B. 1999. Tiberius the politician. London.Google Scholar
Levick, B. 2010. Augustus: image and substance. Harlow.Google Scholar
Levick, B. 2013. ‘In the Phrygian mode: a region seen from without’, in Thonemann, P., (ed.) Roman Phrygia: culture and society. Cambridge: 4154.Google Scholar
Lewis, N. 1991. ‘Hadriani Sententiae’, Greek, Roman and Byzantine Studies 32, 267–80.Google Scholar
Lewis, N. and Reinhold, M. 1990. Roman Civilization II. New York, 3rd ed.Google Scholar
Lightfoot, J. L. 2007. The Sibylline Oracles: with introduction, translation, and commentary on the first and second books. Oxford.Google Scholar
Lintott, A. 1993. Imperium Romanum: politics and administration. London.Google Scholar
Lobur, J. A. 2008. Consensus, concordia, and the formation of Roman imperial ideology. New York and London.Google Scholar
Lomas, K. and Cornell, T. (eds.) 2003. Bread and circuses: euergetism and municipal patronage in Roman Italy. London.Google Scholar
Long, A. A. 2002. Epictetus: a Stoic and Socratic guide to life. Oxford.Google Scholar
Lott, J. B. 2012. Death and dynasty in early imperial Rome: key sources, with text, translation, and commentary. Cambridge.Google Scholar
Lowe, K. 2013. ‘Memoriae Eximere: ad 41 and the survival of republicanism under the principate’, in Powell, A. (ed.) Hindsight in Greek and Roman history. Swansea: 201–21.Google Scholar
Lozano, F. 2017. ‘Emperor worship and Greek leagues: the organization of supra-civic imperial cult in the Roman East’, in Muñiz Grijalvo, E., Cortés Copete, J. M., and Lozano Gomez, F. (eds.) Empire and religion: religious change in Greek cities under Roman rule. Leiden: 149–76.Google Scholar
Luce, T. J. and Woodman, A. J. (eds.) 1993. Tacitus and the Tacitean tradition. Princeton, NJ.Google Scholar
Luke, T. S. 2010. ‘A healing touch for empire: Vespasian’s wonders in Domitianic Rome’, Greece & Rome 57, 77106.Google Scholar
Luraghi, N. 2014. ‘The cunning tyrant: the cultural logic of a narrative pattern,’ in Moreno, A. and Thomas, R. (eds.) The cunning tyrant: the cultural logic of a narrative pattern. Oxford: 6792.Google Scholar
MacLean, R. 2018. Freed slaves and Roman imperial culture: social integration and the transformation of values. Cambridge.Google Scholar
MacMullen, R. 1966. Enemies of the Roman order: treason, unrest, and alienation in the Empire. Cambridge, MA, and London.Google Scholar
Madsen, J. M. 2016. ‘Criticising the benefactors: the Severans and the return of dynastic rule’, in Madsen, J. M. and Lange, C. H. (eds.). Cassius Dio: Greek intellectual and Roman politician. Leiden: 136–58.Google Scholar
Madsen, J. M. and Lange, C. H. (eds.). 2016. Cassius Dio: Greek intellectual and Roman politician. Leiden.Google Scholar
Magdelain, A. 1947. Auctoritas principis. Paris.Google Scholar
Magdelain, A. 1990. ‘De l’“auctoritas partum” à l’“auctoritas senatus”’, Publications de l’École Française de Rome 133, 385403.Google Scholar
Makhlaiuk, A. 2020. ‘Emperors’ nicknames and Roman political humourKlio 102, 202–35.Google Scholar
Malik, S. 2019. ‘Cvcvta ab rationibvs neronis avgvsti: a joke at Nero’s expense’, Classical Quarterly 69, 783–92.Google Scholar
Malik, S. 2020. The Nero-Antichrist. Cambridge.Google Scholar
Mantovani, D. 2008Leges et iura p (opuli) R (omani) restituit”: principe e diritto in un aureo di OttavianoAthenaeum 96, 554.Google Scholar
Marastoni, S., Mastrocinque, A., and Poletti, B. (eds.) 2011. Hereditas, adoptio e potere politico in Roma antica. Rome.Google Scholar
Marincola, J. 1997. Authority and tradition in ancient historiography. Cambridge.Google Scholar
Martin, B. 1996. ‘Calpurnius Sicullus ‘New’ Aurea Aetas’, Acta Classica 39, 17-38.Google Scholar
Mastrocinque, A. 2011a. ‘L’Eredità come Strumento di Legittimazione di Diritti Politici. Introduzione al Problema’, in Marastoni, S., Mastrocinque, A., and Poletti, B. (eds.) Hereditas, adoptio e potere politico in Roma antica. Rome: 114.Google Scholar
Mastrocinque, A. 2011b. ‘L’Eredità Politica al Tempo dei Severi’, in Marastoni, S., Mastrocinque, A., and Poletti, B. (eds.) Hereditas, adoptio e potere politico in Roma antica. Rome: 7183.Google Scholar
Matthews, J. 2010. Roman perspectives: studies in political and cultural history, from the first to the fifth century. Swansea.Google Scholar
Mattingly, D. J. 2011. Imperialism, power, and identity: experiencing the Roman empire. Princeton, NJ.Google Scholar
Mayer, R. 1980. ‘Calpurnius Siculus: technique and date’, Journal of Roman Studies 70, 175–6.Google Scholar
McCormick, M. 1986. Eternal victory: triumphal rulership in late antiquity, Byzantium, and the early medieval West. Cambridge and Paris.Google Scholar
McIntyre, G. 2019. ‘Imperial cult’, Brill Research Perspectives in Ancient History 2, 188.Google Scholar
McNamara, J. and Pagán, V. E. (eds.) 2022. Tacitus’ wonders: empire and paradox in ancient Rome. London.Google Scholar
Millar, F. 1963. ‘The fiscus in the first two centuries’, Journal of Roman Studies 53, 2942.Google Scholar
Millar, F. 1964a. A study of Cassius Dio. Oxford.Google Scholar
Millar, F. 1964b. ‘The Aerarium and its officials under the empire’, Journal of Roman Studies 54, 3340.Google Scholar
Millar, F. 1965. ‘Epictetus and the imperial court’, Journal of Roman Studies 55, 141–8.Google Scholar
Millar, F. 1977. The emperor in the Roman world (31 B.C.–A.D. 337). London.Google Scholar
Millar, F. 1988. ‘Imperial ideology in the Tabula Siarensis’, in Arce, J. and González Fernández, J. (eds.) Estudios sobre la ‘Tabula Siarensis’. Madrid: 1119.Google Scholar
Millar, F. 1993. ‘Ovid and the domus Augusta: Rome seen from Tomoi’, Journal of Roman Studies 83, 117.Google Scholar
Millar, F. 1998. The crowd in Rome in the late Republic. Ann Arbor, MI.Google Scholar
Millar, F. 2002. Rome, the Greek world, and the East: the Roman republic and the Augustan revolution. Chapel Hill, NC; London.Google Scholar
Millar, F. and Giovannini, A. (eds.) 2000. La révolution romaine après Ronald Syme: bilans et perspectives. Geneva.Google Scholar
Millar, F. and Segal, E. (eds.) 1984. Caesar Augustus: seven aspects. Oxford.Google Scholar
Miller, J. F. 2009. Apollo, Augustus, and the poets. Cambridge.Google Scholar
Mitchell, L. 2013. The heroic rulers of Archaic and classical Greece. London and New York.Google Scholar
Mitchell, S. 1993. Anatolia: land, men, and Gods in Asia Minor. 2 vols. Oxford.Google Scholar
Mitchell, S. 2016. ‘ΕΡΜΗΝΕΙΑ: the Greek translations of the sacrae litterae on official hospitality (ad 204)’, in Hazirlayanlar, Y., Takmer, B., Arca, E. N. A., and Özdil, N. G. (eds.) Vir Doctus Anatolicus: studies in memory of Sencer Sahin. Istanbul: 635–9.Google Scholar
Mitford, T. B. 1947. ‘Some published inscriptions of Roman date from Cyprus’, Annual of the British School at Athens 42, 201–30.Google Scholar
Mitford, T. B. 1960. ‘A Cypriot oath of allegiance to Tiberius’, Journal of Roman Studies 50, 75–9.Google Scholar
Morgan, T. 2007. Popular morality in the early Roman Empire. Cambridge.Google Scholar
Morgan, T. 2015. Roman faith and Christian faith: pistis and fides in the early Roman empire and early churches. Oxford.Google Scholar
Moreno, A. and Thomas, R. (eds.) 2014. The cunning tyrant: the cultural logic of a narrative pattern. Oxford.Google Scholar
Morrell, K., Osgood, J., and Welch, K. (eds.) 2019. The alternative Augustan age. Oxford.Google Scholar
Morstein-Marx, R. 2004. Mass oratory and political power in the late Roman republic. Cambridge.Google Scholar
Morstein-Marx, R. 2021. Julius Caesar and the Roman people. Cambridge.Google Scholar
Mossman, J. (ed.) 1997. Plutarch and his intellectual world. Swansea.Google Scholar
Mouritsen, H. 2017. Politics in the Roman republic. Cambridge.Google Scholar
Muñiz Grijalvo, E., Cortés Copete, J. M., and Lozano Gomez, F. (eds.) 2017. Empire and religion: religious change in Greek cities under Roman rule. Leiden.Google Scholar
Murphy, T. M. 2004. Pliny the Elder’s Natural history: the empire in the encyclopedia. Oxford and New York.Google Scholar
Murray, O. 1971. ‘Peri basileias: studies in the justification of monarchic power in the Hellenistic world.’ Unpublished DPhil thesis, University of Oxford.Google Scholar
Musurillo, H. 1954. The acts of the pagan martyrs: Acta Alexandrinorum. Oxford.Google Scholar
Naylor, M. 2010. ‘The Roman imperial cult and revelation’, Currents in Biblical Research 8, 207–39.Google Scholar
Newlands, C. 2002. Statius’ Silvae and the poetics of empire. Cambridge.Google Scholar
Nikolaides, A. (ed.) 2008. The unity of Plutarch’s work. Berlin.Google Scholar
Nicolet, C. 1980. The world of the citizen in republican Rome. London.Google Scholar
Nicolet, C. 1991. Space, geography, and politics in the early Roman empire. Ann Arbor, MI.Google Scholar
Niehoff, M. 2018. Philo of Alexandria: an intellectual biography. New Haven, CT.Google Scholar
Nock, A. D. 1930. ‘Σύνναος θεός’, Harvard Studies in Classical Philology 41, 162.Google Scholar
Nollé, J. 1989. ‘Hans von Aulock, Münzen und Städte Phrygiens 2’, Bonner Jahrbücher 189, 657–60.Google Scholar
Nora, P. 1989. ‘Between memory and history: les lieux de mémoire’, Representations 26, 724.Google Scholar
Noreña, C. 2021. ‘Emperors, benefaction and honorific practice in the Roman imperial Greek polis’, in Gygax, M. D. and Zuiderhoek, A. (eds.) Benefactors and the polis: the public gift in the Greek cities from the Homeric world to late antiquity. Cambridge: 201–21.Google Scholar
Noreña, C. F. 2001. ‘The communication of the emperor’s virtues’, Journal of Roman Studies 91, 146–68.Google Scholar
Noreña, C. F. 2003. ‘Medium and message in Vespasian’s Templum Pacis’, Memoirs of the American Academy in Rome 48, 2543.Google Scholar
Noreña, C. F. 2007. ‘The social economy of Pliny’s correspondence with Trajan’, American Journal of Philology 135, 239–77.Google Scholar
Noreña, C. F. 2011. Imperial ideals in the Roman West: representation, circulation, power. Cambridge.Google Scholar
North, J. A. 1986. ‘Religion and politics, from Republic to principate’, Journal of Roman Studies 76, 251–8.Google Scholar
Nutton, V. 1978. ‘The beneficial ideology’, in Garnsey, P. and Whittaker, C. R. (eds.) Imperialism in the ancient world. Cambridge: 209–21.Google Scholar
O’Gorman, E. 2000. Irony and misreading in the Annals of Tacitus. Cambridge.Google Scholar
O’Gorman, E. 2006. ‘Alternate empires: Tacitus’s virtual history of the Pisonian principate’, Arethusa 39, 281301.Google Scholar
Oliver, J. H. 1971. ‘Epaminondas of Acraephia’, Greek, Roman and Byzantine Studies 12, 221–37.Google Scholar
Oliver, J. H. 1989. Greek constitutions of early Roman emperors from inscriptions and papyri. Philadelphia, PA.Google Scholar
Omissi, A. 2018. Emperors and usurpers in the later Roman empire: civil war, panegyric, and the construction of legitimacy. Oxford.Google Scholar
Osanna, M. 2018. ‘Games, banquets, handouts, and the population of Pompeii as deduced from a new tomb inscription’, Journal of Roman Archaeology 31, 310–22.Google Scholar
Osgood, J. 2011. Claudius Caesar: image and power in the early Roman empire. Cambridge.Google Scholar
Osgood, J. 2013. ‘Suetonius and the accession to Augustus’, in Gibson, A. G. G. (ed.) The Julio-Claudian succession: reality and perception of the “Augustan model”. Leiden: 1940.Google Scholar
Padilla Peralta, D. 2020. ‘Epistemicde: the Roman case’, Classica: Revista Brasileira de Estudos Classicos 33, 151–86.Google Scholar
Pagé, M.-M. 2012. Empereurs et aristocrates bienfaiteurs: autour de l’inauguration des alimenta dans le monde municipal italien (fin Ier siècle – début IVe siècle). Quebec.Google Scholar
Pappano, A. E. 1937. ‘The false Neros’, Classical Journal 32, 385–92.Google Scholar
Pani, M. 1997. La politica in Roman antica. Cultura e prassi. Bari.Google Scholar
Pasco-Pranger, M. 2006. Founding the year: Ovid’s Fasti and the poetics of the Roman calendar. Leiden.Google Scholar
Patterson, J. R. 1987. ‘Crisis: what crisis? Rural change and urban development in imperial Appennine Italy’, Papers of the British School at Rome 55, 115–46.Google Scholar
Pecere, O. and Stramaglia, A. (eds.) 1996. La letteratura di consumo nel mondo greco-latino. Cassino.Google Scholar
Pelling, C. 1983. ‘Cassius Dio und Augustus. Philologische Untersuchungen zu den Büchern 45–56 des Dionischen Geschichtswerkes’, Gnomon 53, 221–6.Google Scholar
Pelling, C. 1993. ‘Tacitus and Germanicus’, in Luce, T. J. and Woodman, A. J. (eds.) Tacitus and the Tacitean tradition. Princeton, NJ: 5985.Google Scholar
Pelling, C. 1997. ‘Biographical history? Cassius Dio on the early principate’, in Edwards, M. J. and Swain, S. (eds.) Portraits: biographical representation in the Greek and Latin literature of the Roman Empire. Oxford: 197213.Google Scholar
Pelling, C. 2009. ‘Tacitus’ personal voice’, in Woodman, A. J. (ed.) The Cambridge companion to Tacitus. Cambridge: 147–67.Google Scholar
Petsalis-Diomidis, A. 2010. Truly beyond wonders: Aelius Aristides and the cult of Asklepios. Oxford.Google Scholar
Plisecka, A. 2019. ‘Material aspects of Severan legislation in the light of documentary papyri’, in Ritter-Schmalz, C. and Schwitter, R. (eds.) Antike Texte und ihre Materialität: Alltägliche Präsenx, mediale Semantik, literarische Reflexion. Berlin: 287308.Google Scholar
Potter, D. S. 1990. Prophecy and history in the crisis of the Roman empire: a historical commentary on the Thirteenth Sibylline Oracle. Oxford.Google Scholar
Potter, D. S. 1994. Prophets and emperors: human and divine authority from Augustus to Theodosius. Cambridge, MA, and London.Google Scholar
Powell, A. (ed.) 1992. Roman poetry and propaganda in the age of Augustus. London.Google Scholar
Powell, A. (ed.) 2013. Hindsight in Greek and Roman history. Swansea.Google Scholar
Price, J. J. and Berthelot, K. (eds.) 2020. The future of Rome: Roman, Greek, Jewish and Christian visions. Cambridge.Google Scholar
Price, S. R. F. 1980. ‘Between man and god: sacrifice in the Roman imperial cult’, Journal of Roman Studies 70, 2843.Google Scholar
Price, S. R. F. 1984a. ‘Gods and emperors: the Greek language of the Roman imperial cult’, Journal of Hellenic Studies 104, 7995.Google Scholar
Price, S. R. F. 1984b. Rituals and power: the Roman imperial cult in Asia Minor. Cambridge.Google Scholar
Price, S. R. F. 1986. ‘The future of dreams: from Freud to Artemidorus’, Past & Present, 113, 337.Google Scholar
Price, S. R. F. 1987. ‘From noble funerals to divine cult: the consecration of Roman emperors’, in Cannadine, D. and Price, S. R. F. (eds.) Rituals of royalty: power and ceremonial in traditional societies. Cambridge: 56105.Google Scholar
Purcell, N. 1990. ‘Maps, lists, money, order and power’, Journal of Roman Studies 80, 178–82.Google Scholar
Purcell, N. 1994. ‘The city of Rome and the plebs urbana in the late Republic’, CAH2 9, 644–88.Google Scholar
Purcell, N. 1995. ‘Eating fish: the paradoxes of seafood’, in Wilkins, J., Dobson, M., and Harvey, D. (eds.) Food in antiquity. Exeter: 132–50.Google Scholar
Purcell, N. 1996. ‘Rome and its development under Augustus and his successors’, CAH2 10: 782811.Google Scholar
Purcell, N. 1998. ‘Alla scoperta di una costa residenziale romana: il litus Laurentinum e l’archeologia dell’otium’, in Lauro, M. G. (ed.) Castelporziano III: campagne di scavo e restauro 1987–1991. Rome: 1132.Google Scholar
Purcell, N. 1999. ‘Does Caesar mime?’, in Bergmann, B. A. and Kondoleon, C. (eds.) The art of ancient spectacle. Washington, DC, and New Haven, CT: 181–93.Google Scholar
Raaflaub, K., Toher, M., and Bowersock, G. (eds.) 1990. Between republic and empire: interpretations of Augustus and his principate. Berkeley, CA, and London.Google Scholar
Radice, B. 1968. ‘Pliny and the Panegyricus, Greece & Rome 15, 166–72.Google Scholar
Rafferty, D. 2021. ‘Rural voters in roman elections’, Transactions of the American Philological Association 151, 127–53.Google Scholar
Rawson, B. (ed.) 1991. Marriage, divorce, and children in ancient Rome. Oxford.Google Scholar
Rees, R. 2001. ‘To be and not to be: Pliny’s paradoxical Trajan’, Bulletin of the Institute of Classical Studies 45, 149–68.Google Scholar
Rees, R. 2002. Layers of loyalty in Latin panegyric, ad 289–307. Oxford.Google Scholar
Revell, L. 2009. Roman imperialism and local identities. Cambridge.Google Scholar
Rich, J. 2012Making the emergency permanent: auctoritas, potestas and the evolution of the principate of Augustus’, in Rivière, Y. (ed.) Des réformes augustéennes. Rome: 37121.Google Scholar
Rich, J. W. and Williams, J. H. C. 1999. ‘Leges et Ivra PR Restitvit: a new aureus of Octavian and the settlement of 28–27 bc’, Numismatic Chronicle 159, 169-213.Google Scholar
Ritter-Schmalz, C. and Schwitter, R. (eds.) 2019. Antike Texte und ihre Materialität: Alltägliche Präsenx, mediale Semantik, literarische Reflexion. Berlin.Google Scholar
Rivière, Y. (ed.) 2012. Des réformes augustéennes. Rome.Google Scholar
Rizakis, A. D. and Camia, F. (eds.) 2008. Pathways to power: civic elites in the eastern part of the Roman Empire. Athens.Google Scholar
Rodríguez, G. 2021. ‘New observations on the three arches of Benevento’, in de Angelis, F. (ed.) Emperors in images, architecture, and ritual. Boston, MA: 6178.Google Scholar
Rogers, G. M. 1991. The sacred identity of Ephesos: foundation myths of a Roman city. London.Google Scholar
Rogers, G. M. 2012. The mysteries of Artemis of Ephesos: cult, polis, and change in the Graeco-Roman world. New Haven, CT, and London.Google Scholar
Rogers, R. S. 1955. ‘Heirs and rivals to Nero’, Transactions of the American Philological Association 86, 190212.Google Scholar
Roller, M. 2001. Constructing autocracy: aristocrats and emperors in Julio-Claudian Rome. Princeton, NJ.Google Scholar
Roller, M. 2018. Models from the past in Roman culture: a world of exempla. Cambridge.Google Scholar
Romm, J. S. 1992. The edges of the earth in ancient thought: geography, exploration, and fiction. Princeton, NJ.Google Scholar
Rose, C. B. 1997. Dynastic commemoration and imperial portraiture in the Julio-Claudian period. Cambridge.Google Scholar
Rosenblitt, A. 2016. ‘Hostile politics: Sallust and the rhetoric of popular champions in the Late Republic’, American Journal of Philology 137, 655–88.Google Scholar
Rosillo-López, C. 2017. Public opinion and politics in the late Roman Republic. Cambridge.Google Scholar
Ross, D. O. 1973. ‘The Tacitean Germanicus’, Yale Classical Studies 23, 209–27.Google Scholar
Roueché, C. 1984. ‘Acclamations in the later Roman empire: new evidence from Aphrodisias’, Journal of Roman Studies 74, 181–99.Google Scholar
Rowan, C. 2019. From Caesar to Augustus (c. 49 bcad 14): using coins as sources. Cambridge.Google Scholar
Rowan, C. 2020. ‘The imperial image in media of mechanical reproduction’, in Russell, A. and Hellström, M. (eds.) The social dynamics of Roman imperial imagery. Cambridge: 247–74.Google Scholar
Rowe, C. K. 2009. World upside down: reading Acts in the Graeco-Roman age. Oxford.Google Scholar
Rowe, G. 2002. Princes and political cultures: the new Tiberian senatorial decrees. Ann Arbor, MI.Google Scholar
Rowe, G. 2013. ‘Reconsidering the auctoritas of Augustus’, Journal of Roman Studies 103, 115.Google Scholar
Rudich, V. 1993. Political dissidence under Nero: the price of dissimulation. London.Google Scholar
Rüfner, T. 2016. ‘Imperial cognitio process’, in du Plessis, P., Ando, C., and Tuori, K. (eds.). The Oxford handbook of Roman law and society. Oxford: 257–69.Google Scholar
Rüpke, J. (ed.) 2007. A companion to Roman religion. Oxford.Google Scholar
Rüpke, J. 2011. The Roman calendar from Numa to Constantine: time, history, and the fasti. Oxford.Google Scholar
Russell, A. 2016. The politics of public space in Republican Rome. Cambridge.Google Scholar
Russell, A. 2019. ‘Inventing the imperial Senate’, in Morrell, K., Osgood, J., and Welch, K. (eds.) The alternative Augustan age. Oxford: 325–42.Google Scholar
Russell, A. 2020. ‘The altars of the Lares Augusti: a view from the streets of Augustan iconography’, in Russell, A. and Hellström, M. (eds.) The social dynamics of Roman imperial imagery. Cambridge: 2551.Google Scholar
Russell, A. and Hellström, M. (eds.) 2020. The social dynamics of Roman imperial imagery. Cambridge.Google Scholar
Russell, D. A. and Wilson, N. G. (eds.) 1981. Menander Rhetor: a commentary. Oxford.Google Scholar
Rutledge, S. 2001. Imperial inquisitions: prosecutors and informants from Tiberius to Domitian. London.Google Scholar
Rutledge, S. 2012. Ancient Rome as a museum: power, identity, and the culture of collecting. Oxford.Google Scholar
Ryberg, I. S. 1966. ‘Clupeus Virtutis’, in Wallach, L. (ed.) The classical tradition: literary and historical studies in honor of Harry Caplan. Ithaca, NY: 232–8.Google Scholar
Sailor, D. 2008. Writing and empire in Tacitus. Cambridge.Google Scholar
Saller, R. P. 1980. ‘Anecdotes as historical evidence for the principate’, Greece & Rome 27, 6983.Google Scholar
Saller, R. P. 1984. ‘“Familia, Domus”, and the Roman conception of the family’, Phoenix 38, 336–55.Google Scholar
Saller, R. P. 1994. Patriarchy, property and death in the Roman family. Cambridge.Google Scholar
Salzman, M. R. 1991. On Roman time: the codex-calendar of 354 and the rhythms of urban life in late antiquity. Berkeley, CA.Google Scholar
Schäfer, T. 1989. Imperii insignia: Sella curulis und Fasce: zur Repräsentation römischer Magistrate. Mainz.Google Scholar
Scheid, J. 2003. An introduction to Roman religion. Bloomington, IN.Google Scholar
Schepens, G. and Delcroix, K. 1996. ‘Ancient paradoxography: origin, evolution, production and reception’, in Pecere, O. and Stramaglia, A. (eds.) La letteratura di consumo nel mondo greco-latino. Cassino: 373460.Google Scholar
Schulz, F. 1945. ‘Bracton on kingship’, The English Historical Review 60, 136–76.Google Scholar
Scott, A. G. 2019. ‘Cassius Dio and the Augustan settlement’, Histos 13, lxvilxx.Google Scholar
Scott, J. C. 1985. Weapons of the weak: everyday forms of peasant resistance. New Haven, CT, and London.Google Scholar
Scott, J. C. 1990. Domination and the arts of resistance: hidden transcripts. New Haven, CT, and London.Google Scholar
Scott, K. 1930a. ‘Drusus, nicknamed “Castor”’, Classical Philology 25, 155–61.Google Scholar
Scott, K. 1930b. ‘The Dioscuri and the imperial cult’, Classical Philology 25, 379–80.Google Scholar
Severy, B. 2003. Augustus and the family at the birth of the Roman empire. New York and London.Google Scholar
Shannon-Henderson, K. 2022. ‘Tacitus and paradoxography’, in McNamara, J. and Pagán, V. E. (eds.) Tacitus’ wonders: empire and paradox in ancient Rome. London: 1751.Google Scholar
Shaw, B. D. 1982. ‘Social science and ancient history: Keith Hopkins In Partibus Infidelium’, Helios 9, 1757.Google Scholar
Shaw, B. D. 1984. ‘Bandits in the Roman empire’, Past & Present 105, 352.Google Scholar
Shaw, B. D. 2019. ‘Did the Romans have a future?’, Journal of Roman Studies 109, 126.Google Scholar
Sherwin-White, A. N. 1963. Roman society and Roman law in the New Testament. Oxford.Google Scholar
Slater, W. J. (ed.) 1996. Roman theater and society: E. Togo Salmon papers I. Ann Arbor, MI.Google Scholar
Sluiter, I. and Rosen, R. M. 2004. Free speech in classical antiquity. Leiden.Google Scholar
Smith, C. J. 2006. The Roman clan: the gens from ancient ideology to modern anthropology. Cambridge.Google Scholar
Smith, R. R. R. 1987. ‘The imperial reliefs from the Sebasteion at Aphrodisias’, Journal of Roman Studies 77, 88138.Google Scholar
Smith, R. R. R. 2013. The marble reliefs from the Julio-Claudian Sebasteion. Mainz.Google Scholar
Smolenaars, J. J. L. 1987. ‘Labour in the golden age: a unifying theme in Vergil’s poems’, Mnemosyne 40, 391405.Google Scholar
Sogno, C. 2006. Q. Aurelius Symmachus: a political biography. Ann Arbor, MI.Google Scholar
Stacey, P. 2014. ‘The Princely Republic’, Journal of Roman Studies 104, 133154.Google Scholar
Starr, C. G. 1949. ‘Epictetus and the tyrant’, Classical Philology 44, 2029.Google Scholar
Steffensen, N. 2018. Nachdenken über Rom: literarische Konstruktionen der römischen Geschichte in der Formierungsphase des Principats. Stuttgart.Google Scholar
Stern, S. 2010. ‘A “Jewish” birth record, Sambat-, and the Calendar of Salamis’, Zeitschrift für Papyrologie und Epigraphik 172, 105–14.Google Scholar
Stern, S. 2012. Calendars in antiquity: empires, states, and societies. Oxford.Google Scholar
Stern, S. (ed.) 2021. Calendars in the making: the origins of calendars from the Roman empire to the later Middle Ages. Leiden.Google Scholar
Stewart, C. 2019. ‘Fractional arithmetic in the Tabula Alimentaria of Veleia’, Journal of Roman Studies 109, 89102.Google Scholar
Stewart, P. 2003. Statues in Roman society: representation and response. Oxford.Google Scholar
Straumann, B. 2016. Crisis and constitutionalism: Roman political thought from the fall of the republic to the age of revolution. Oxford.Google Scholar
Strauss, B. S. 1993. Fathers and sons in Athens: ideology and society in the era of the Peloponnesian War. London.Google Scholar
Sumi, G. S. 2002. ‘Impersonating the dead: mimes at Roman funeralsAmerican Journal of Philology 123, 559–85.Google Scholar
Syme, R. 1939. The Roman revolution. Oxford.Google Scholar
Syme, R. 1958. Tacitus. Oxford.Google Scholar
Syme, R. 1961. ‘Who was Vedius Pollio?’, Journal of Roman Studies 51, 2330.Google Scholar
Syme, R. 1969. ‘Pliny the procurator’, Harvard Studies in Classical Philology 73, 201–36.Google Scholar
Syme, R. 1980. ‘Biographers of the Caesars’, Museum Helveticum 37, 104–28.Google Scholar
Tan, J. 2019. ‘How do you solve a problem like Marcus Agrippa?’, in Morrell, K., Osgood, J., and Welch, K. (eds.) The alternative Augustan age. Oxford: 182–98.Google Scholar
Thom, J. 2009. ‘Justice in the Sermon on the Mount: an Aristotelian reading’, Novum Testamentum 51, 314–38.Google Scholar
Thonemann, P. (ed.) 2013. Roman Phrygia: culture and society. Cambridge.Google Scholar
Thonemann, P. 2020. An ancient dream manual: Artemidorus’ The Interpretation of Dreams. Oxford.Google Scholar
Toner, J. P. 2009. Popular culture in ancient Rome. Cambridge.Google Scholar
Torelli, M. 1997. ‘Ex his castra, ex his tribus replebuntur”: the Marble Panegyric on the Arch of Trajan at Beneventum’, Studies in the History of Art, 49, 144–77.Google Scholar
Townend, G. B. 1980. ‘Calpurnius Siculus and the Munus Neronis’, Journal of Roman Studies 70, 166–74.Google Scholar
Trédé-Boulmer, M. 2015. Kairos: l’à-propos et l’occasion: le mot et la notion, d’Homère à la fin du IVe siècle. Paris.Google Scholar
Trentin, L. 2011. ‘Deformity in the Roman imperial court’, Greece & Rome 58, 195208.Google Scholar
Tuori, K. 2016. The emperor of law: the emergence of Roman imperial adjudication. Oxford.Google Scholar
Turpin, W. 2008. ‘Tacitus, Stoic exempla, and the praecipuum munus annalium’, Classical Antiquity 27, 359404.Google Scholar
Valente, W. A., Talbert, R. J. A, Hallett, J. P., and Mackowiak, P. A. 2002Caveat cenans’, The American Journal of Medicine 112, 392–8.Google Scholar
Varner, E. R. 2004. Mutilation and transformation: damnatio memoriae and Roman imperial portraiture. Leiden and Boston, MA.Google Scholar
Vassileiou, A. 1984. ‘Caius ou Lucius Caesar proclamé princeps iuuentutis par l’ordre équestre’, in Walter, H. (ed.) Hommages à Lucien Lerat. Paris: 827–40.Google Scholar
Versnel, H. S. 1970. Triumphus: an inquiry into the origin, development and meaning of the Roman triumph. Leiden.Google Scholar
Versnel, H. S. 1976. ‘Two types of Roman devotio’, Mnemosyne 29, 365410.Google Scholar
Versnel, H. S. 1980. ‘Destruction, devotio and despair in a situation of anomy: the mourning of Germanicus in triple perspective’, in Brelich, A. (ed.) Perennitas: studi in onore di Angelo Brelich. Rome: 541618.Google Scholar
Versnel, H. S. 1993a. Inconsistencies in Greek and Roman religion: transition and reversal in myth and ritual. Leiden and New York.Google Scholar
Versnel, H. S. 1993b. ‘Two carnivalesque princes: Augustus and Claudius and the ambiguity of Saturnalian imagery’, in Döpp, S., (ed.) Karnevaleske Phänomene in antiken und nachantiken Kulturen und Literaturen. Trier: 99122.Google Scholar
Vervaet, F. J. 2014. The high command in the Roman republic: the principle of the summum imperium auspiciumque from 509 to 19 BCE. Stuttgart.Google Scholar
Vervaet, F. J. 2020. ‘Subsidia dominationi: the early careers of Tiberius Claudius Nero and Nero Claudius Drusus revisitedKlio 102, 121201.Google Scholar
Veyne, P. 1976. Le pain et le cirque: sociologie historique d’un pluralisme politique. Paris.Google Scholar
Veyne, P. 1988. Did the Greeks believe in their myths? An essay on the constitutive imagination. Chicago.Google Scholar
Veyne, P. 1990. Bread and circuses: historical sociology and political pluralism. London.Google Scholar
Veyne, P. 2002. ‘Qu’était-ce qu’un empereur romain’, Diogène 199, 325.Google Scholar
Wallace-Hadrill, A. 1981a. ‘Galba’s aequitas’, Numismatic Chronicle 141, 2039.Google Scholar
Wallace-Hadrill, A. 1981b. ‘The emperor and his virtues’, Historia 30, 298323.Google Scholar
Wallace-Hadrill, A. 1982a. ‘Civilis princeps: between citizen and king’, Journal of Roman Studies 72, 3248.Google Scholar
Wallace-Hadrill, A. 1982b. ‘The golden age and sin in Augustan ideology’, Past & Present 95, 1936.Google Scholar
Wallach, L. (ed.) 1966. The classical tradition: literary and historical studies in honor of Harry Caplan. Ithaca, NY.Google Scholar
Walter, H. (ed.) 1984. Hommages à Lucien Lerat. Paris.Google Scholar
Weaver, P. R. C. 1972. Familia Caesaris: a social study of the emperor’s freedmen and slaves. Cambridge.Google Scholar
Webb, R. 2008. Demons and dancers: performance in late antiquity. Cambridge, MA, and London.Google Scholar
Weber, M. 1978. Economy and society: an outline of interpretive sociology. Berkeley, CA.Google Scholar
Weinstock, S. 1971. Divus Julius. Oxford.Google Scholar
Welch, K. E. 2007. The Roman amphitheatre: from its origins to the Colosseum. New York and Cambridge.Google Scholar
Whitton, C. 2015. ‘Pliny’s progress: on a troublesome Domitianic career’, Chiron 45, 122.Google Scholar
Wilkins, J., Dobson, M., and Harvey, D. (eds.) 1995. Food in antiquity. Exeter.Google Scholar
Winterling, A. 2009. Politics and society in imperial Rome. Chichester.Google Scholar
Wintrobe, R. 1998. The political economy of dictatorship. Cambridge.Google Scholar
Wirszubski, C. 1950. Libertas as a political idea at Rome during the late Republic and early principate. Cambridge.Google Scholar
Wiseman, T. P. 1982Calpurnius Siculus and the Claudian Civil War’, Journal of Roman Studies, 72, 5767.Google Scholar
Wiseman, T. P. 2009. Remembering the Roman people: essays on late-Republican politics and literature. Oxford.Google Scholar
Wiseman, T. P. (ed.) 2013. The death of Caligula: Josephus Ant. Jud. xix 1–273. Liverpool.Google Scholar
Wiseman, T. P. 2019. The house of Augustus: a historical detective story. Princeton, NJ.Google Scholar
Wolf, J. G. 2011. Die Lex Irnitana: ein römisches Stadtrecht aus Spanien: lateinisch und deutsch. Darmstadt.Google Scholar
Woodman, A. J. 1992. ‘Nero’s alien capital: Tacitus as paradoxographer (Annals 15.36–7)’, in Woodman, A. J. and Powell, J. G. F. (eds.) Author and audience in Latin literature. Cambridge: 173–88.Google Scholar
Woodman, A. J. 1998. Tacitus reviewed. Oxford.Google Scholar
Woodman, A. J. 2004. Tacitus: The Annals. Translated, with introduction and notes. Indianapolis.Google Scholar
Woodman, A. J. (ed.) 2009. The Cambridge companion to Tacitus. Cambridge.Google Scholar
Woodman, A. J. and Powell, J. G. F. (eds.) 1992. Author and audience in Latin literature. Cambridge.Google Scholar
Woolf, G. 1990. ‘Food, poverty and patronage: the significance of the epigraphy of the Roman alimentary schemes in early imperial Italy’, Papers of the British School at Rome 58, 197228.Google Scholar
Woolf, G. 2015. ‘Pliny/Trajan and the poetics of empire’, Classical Philology 110, 132–51.Google Scholar
Wytzes, J. 1977. Der letzte Kampf des Heidentums in Rom. Leiden.Google Scholar
Yakobson, A. 1992. ‘Petitio et largitio: popular participation in the centuriate assembly of the late republic’, Journal of Roman Studies 82, 3252.Google Scholar
Yakobson, A. 2010. ‘Traditional political culture and the people’s role in the Roman republicHistoria 59, 282302.Google Scholar
Yavetz, Z. 1965. ‘Levitas popularis’, Atene & Roma 10, 99110.Google Scholar
Yavetz, Z. 1969. Plebs and princeps. Oxford.Google Scholar
Yavetz, Z. 1990. ‘The personality of Augustus: reflections on Syme’s Roman revolution’ in Raaflaub, K., Toher, M., and Bowersock, G. (eds.) Between republic and empire: interpretations of Augustus and his principate. Berkeley, CA, and London: 2141.Google Scholar
Zadorojnyi, A. V. 2015. ‘Colour in Suetonius’ Lives of the Caesars’, in Ash, R., Mossman, J., and Titchener, F. B. (eds.) Fame and infamy: essays for Christopher Pelling on characterization in Greek and Roman biography and historiography. Oxford: 286–98.Google Scholar
Zanker, P. 1987. Augustus und die Macht der Bilder. Munich.Google Scholar
Zanker, P. 1988. The power of images in the age of Augustus. Ann Arbor, MI.Google Scholar
Zuiderhoek, A. 2009. The politics of munificence in the Roman empire: citizens, elites and benefactors in Asia Minor. Cambridge.Google Scholar