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Introduction

War Refugee Children, Humanitarianism and Transnationalism

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  28 July 2022

Joy Damousi
Affiliation:
Australian Catholic University, Melbourne
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Summary

In November 1919, the Adelaide Advertiser reported that, among the Australian troops who had disembarked from the warship Port Sydney returning from the theatre of war, was a Belgian boy. Described as a ‘diminutive figure’, dressed in an Australian military uniform, the twelve-year-old became known as Albert. It was reported that his father had been killed while serving in the Belgian army and his mother had died of starvation, and that an Australian soldier, Private George Leahy, had ‘adopted’ him. Albert was referred to as a ‘war waif’.1 After being snatched from the battlefields of Europe, Albert Dussart remained in Australia for the rest of his life. Leahy had, according to these reports, stuffed him in his chaff bag and brought him to Australia. Tasmanian newspaper the World reported that the story ‘is surely one of the most human and touching that the whole of the war has produced’.2

Type
Chapter
Information
The Humanitarians
Child War Refugees and Australian Humanitarianism in a Transnational World, 1919–1975
, pp. 1 - 20
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2022

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  • Introduction
  • Joy Damousi, Australian Catholic University, Melbourne
  • Book: The Humanitarians
  • Online publication: 28 July 2022
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108983204.001
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  • Introduction
  • Joy Damousi, Australian Catholic University, Melbourne
  • Book: The Humanitarians
  • Online publication: 28 July 2022
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108983204.001
Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

  • Introduction
  • Joy Damousi, Australian Catholic University, Melbourne
  • Book: The Humanitarians
  • Online publication: 28 July 2022
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108983204.001
Available formats
×