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Annotated Bibliography for Future Research

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 August 2018

Elizabeth Swanson
Affiliation:
Babson College
James Brewer Stewart
Affiliation:
Macalester College, Minnesota
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Human Bondage and Abolition
New Histories of Past and Present Slaveries
, pp. 335 - 340
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2018

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References

Plantation Slavery and Abolition, and Their Legacies in the Americas

Alexander, Michelle. The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness. New York: The New Press, 2010.Google Scholar
Chronicles the targeting of black men through the “War on Drugs” and the transformation of United States prisons into a stringent system of racial control.
Beckert, Sven, Empire of Cotton: A Global History. New York: Vintage, 2014.Google Scholar
A historical examination of the counterpoint between cotton production, enslavement, and the development of global capitalism.
Berlin, Ira, Generations of Captivity: A History of African American Slaves. Cambridge, MA: Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 2003.Google Scholar
A comprehensive scholarly examination of the development and evolution of African American enslavement from 1700 onward.
Berlin, Ira, The Long Emancipation: The Demise of Slavery in the United States. Cambridge, MA: Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 2015.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Presents the history of slave emancipation in the United States while stressing its gradual elimination in the North as well as the struggle for emancipation in the South.
Blackmon, Douglas A. Slavery by Another Name: The Re-Enslavement of Black Americans from the Civil War to World War II. New York: Anchor Press, 2008.Google Scholar
An authoritative historical account of the re-enslavement of post-Civil War African Americans through systems of convict leasing, debt peonage, and mass incarceration.
Blight, David, Race and Reunion: The Civil War in American Memory. Cambridge, MA: Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 2002.Google Scholar
Examines how post-Civil War Americans explained that war to themselves and one another in terms of race, region, and nationality.
Child, Denis, Slaves of the State: Black Incarceration from the Chain Gang to the Penitentiary. Minneapolis, MN and London: University of Minnesota Press, 2015.Google Scholar
An in-depth, interdisciplinary investigation of the origins, evolution, and impact of the contemporary carceral state.
Daniel, Pete R. The Shadow of Slavery: Peonage in the South, 1901–1969. Champaign-Urbana, IL: University of Illinois Press, 1990.Google Scholar
Examines the history of debt peonage as a method of re-enslavement of emancipated African Americans.
Davis, David Brion. The Problem of Slavery in the Age of Emancipation. New York: Vintage, 2014.Google Scholar
Davis, David Brion. The Problem of Slavery in the Age of Revolution, 1770–1823. New York and Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1999.Google Scholar
Davis, David Brion. The Problem of Slavery in Western Culture. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1966.Google Scholar
Davis, David Brion. Inhuman Bondage: The Rise and Fall of Slavery in the New World. Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 2006.Google Scholar
The author of these four volumes is recognized the world over for his richly informed transnational accounts of the problem of slavery in the Western world from the Middle Ages through the end of the American Civil War.
Drescher, Seymour. Abolition: A History of Slavery and Antislavery. Cambridge and New York: Cambridge University Press, 2009.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
A detailed history of the rise and evolution of Western abolitionist movements from the late eighteenth century onward.
Eltis, David, and Richardson, David, The Atlas of the Transatlantic Slave Trade. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 2010.Google Scholar
The authoritative historical source of the size, scope, and dynamics of the Atlantic slave trade.
Follett, Richard, Foner, Eric, and Johnson, Walter. Slavery’s Ghost: The Problem of Freedom in the Age of Emancipation. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2013.Google Scholar
In three provocative essays, the authors assess the meaning of freedom for enslaved and free Americans in the decades before and after the Civil War, excavating local and national histories of reconstruction from the perspectives of the newly emancipated and of both Northern and Southern white Americans.
Foner, Eric. “Nothing but Freedom”: Emancipation and its Legacies. Baton Rouge, LA: Louisiana State University Press, 1987.
Traces the evolution of post-Emancipation black labor in the Southern United States in local, regional, and comparative settings.
Glickstein, Jonathan. Concepts of Free Labor in Antebellum America. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 1991.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
A historical analysis of American beliefs regarding free and slave labor that illuminates abolitionists’ perceptions and moral judgments.
Hardesty, Jared Ross. Unfreedom: Slavery and Dependence in Eighteen Century Boston. New York: New York University Press, 2016.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hardesty constructs a broad history that challenges the dichotomy slavery v. freedom by showing the many forms of dependence and servitude that shaped the lives of eighteenth-century white and black Bostonians, and by revealing the struggles of enslaved people for autonomy and recognition even within the bonds of the slave systems.
Hartman, Saidiya. Scenes of Subjection: Terror, Slavery, and Self-Making in Nineteenth Century America. Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 1997.Google Scholar
A close examination of rituals of dominance practiced by antebellum slaveholders and expressions of resistance by the enslaved.
Jackson, Maurice. Let This Voice Be Heard: Anthony Benezet, Father of Atlantic Abolitionism. Philadelphia, PA: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2009.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Jackson offers a robust intellectual biography of eighteenth-century anti-slavery activist Anthony Benezet, chronicling his mobilization of Enlightenment and Quaker philosophies alongside narratives of enslaved persons and slave traders themselves to help found a thriving transnational abolitionist movement.
Johnson, Walter. River of Dark Dreams: Slavery and Empire in the Cotton Kingdom. Cambridge, MA: Belknap Press, 2013.Google Scholar
Walter Johnson writes a transformative history of the Cotton Kingdom of the old South, centering the damage done to Native American communities and to enslaved persons as the Mississippi Valley was made into the capital of the cotton economy that fueled the rise of transnational capitalism on the backs of those bought and sold in the transatlantic slave trade.
LeFlouria, Talitha L. Chained in Silence: Black Women and Convict Labor in the New South. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina Press, 2016.Google Scholar
A scholarly historical examination of the re-enslavement of African American women in the Deep South and their responses to their exploitation.
Oshinsky, David M. “Worse Than Slavery”: Parchman Farm and the Ordeal of Jim Crow Justice. New York: Free Press, 1996.
An in-depth historical portrayal of post-Emancipation Southern enslavement as practiced in one particularly notorious state prison.
Resendez, Andres. The Other Slavery: The Uncovered History of Indian Enslavement in America. New York: Houghton Mifflin, 2016.Google Scholar
A path-breaking study of the enslavement of Indian Americans throughout the Western Hemisphere from the time of the Spanish Conquest to the opening of the twentieth century.
Schermerhorn, Calvin. The Business of Slavery and the Rise of American Capitalism 1815–1860. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 2015.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
This volume presents the intertwined history of capitalism and slavery in the nineteenth-century United States, demonstrating how the highly destructive institution of slavery also contributed greatly to the growing capitalist economy of the country.
Sharpe, Christina. Monstrous Intimacies: Making Post-Slavery Subjects. Durham, NC and London: Duke University Press, 2010.Google Scholar
An exploration of how sexual violence and sadism have constructed both black and white subjectivity during the era of plantation slavery and beyond.
Sinha, Mansiha. The Slave’s Cause: A History of Abolition. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 2016.Google Scholar
The most in-depth and complete historical account currently available of the American abolitionist movement.
Stewart, James Brewer. Holy Warriors: The Abolitionists and American Slavery. New York: Hill and Wang, 1997.Google Scholar
The most accessible history of the American abolitionist movement currently available, notable for its focus on the role of women in the movement.
Walters, Ronald. The Antislavery Appeal: Abolition after 1831. Baltimore, MD: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 1978.Google Scholar
A wide-ranging analysis of American abolitionists’ ideological convictions regarding religion, family economy, sexuality, and enslavement.
Warren, Wendy. New England Bound: Slavery and Colonization in Early America. New York: Liveright Publishing, 2016.Google Scholar
Shifting the typical focus of slavery studies from the Southern US, Warren chronicles the central role of enslavement to the earliest days of colonial settlement in New England.
Wheat, David. Atlantic Africa and the Spanish Caribbean 1570–1640. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina Press, 2016.Google Scholar
Wheat’s important study resituates the Spanish Caribbean as an important part of the combined Portuguese and Spanish empires, studying the impact of Luso-Africans in the Spanish Caribbean at the start of the transatlantic slave trade.

Human Trafficking and Contemporary Global Slavery

Augustin, Laura Maria. Sex at the Margin: Migration, Labor Markets and the Rescue Industry. London: Zed Books, 2007.Google Scholar
Critiques the “savior complex” that motivates some opponents of sexual enslavement and offers a careful investigation of what motivates those who become sex workers.
Bales, Kevin. Disposable People: The New Slavery and the Global Economy. 3rd edition. Berkeley and Los Angeles, CA: University of California Press, 2012.Google Scholar
Offers an accessible overall introduction to the problem of today’s slavery.
Bales, Kevin. Blood and Earth: Modern Slavery, Ecocide, and the Secret of Saving the World. New York: Spiegel and Grau, 2016.Google Scholar
Explores linkages between enslavement and the destruction of natural environments, arguing that abolitionist activism is also environmental activism.
Bales, Kevin. Ending Slavery: How We Free Today’s Slaves. Berkeley and Los Angeles, CA: University of California Press, 2008.Google Scholar
Develops the case for a global economic strategy for eliminating contemporary slavery.
Bales, Kevin, Trodd, Zoe, and Williamson, Alex Kent. Modern Slavery: The Secret World of 27 Million People. New York: One World Press, 2009.Google Scholar
An overview accompanied by statistics of the various forms of enslavement across the globe.
Bales, Kevin, and Soodalter, Ron. The Slave Next Door: Human Trafficking and Slavery in America Today. Berkeley and Los Angeles, CA: University of California Press, 2010.Google Scholar
An instructive introduction to the problem of slavery in the twenty-first century within the United States.
Bales, Kevin, and Trodd, Zoe. To Plead Our Own Cause: Personal Stories of Today’s Slaves. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 2009.Google Scholar
Presents a rich and varied collection of personal testimony given by survivors of contemporary slavery.
Brysk, Alison, and Choi-Firzpatrick, Austin. From Human Trafficking to Human Rights: Reframing Contemporary Slavery. Philadelphia, PA: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2012.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Effectively critiques overly broad and/or restrictive definitions of contemporary slavery and argues for the application of human rights approaches.
Craig, Gary, ed. Child Slavery Now: A Contemporary Reader. Bristol, UK and Portland, OR: Policy Press, 2010.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Essays by nineteen leading authorities convey a global picture of child slavery and offer strategies for opposing it.
Davidson, Julia O’Connell. Modern Slavery: The Margins of Freedom. London and New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2015.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
A comprehensive critique of the “modern abolitionist” movement’s ideological and programmatic inconsistencies that argues for human rights solutions to problems of labor exploitation.
Duane, Anna Mae, ed. Child Slavery before and after Emancipation: An Argument for Child-Centered Studies of Slavery. Cambridge and New York: Cambridge University Press, 2017.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Eleven original essays consider child slavery in historical and contemporary contexts while examining ethical and definitional problems within the field of slavery studies more generally.
Hoang, Kimberly Kay, and Parrenas, Rhacel Salazar, eds. Human Trafficking Reconsidered: Rethinking the Problem, Envisioning New Solutions. New York: International Debate Education Association Press, 2014.Google Scholar
Original essays that analyze the effectiveness of current anti-trafficking regimes and the problems facing anti-trafficking advocates on the ground.
Kara, Siddharth. Bonded Labor: Tackling the System of Slavery in South Asia. New York: Columbia University Press, 2014.Google Scholar
An extended account based on personal experience and governmental reports of the many forms of labor exploitation practiced in India, Pakistan, and Nepal.
Kara, Siddharth. Sex Trafficking: Inside the Business of Modern Slavery. New York: Columbia University Press, 2010.Google Scholar
A broad survey of sexual enslavement grounded in personal observations and detailed with statistics derived from governmental and law enforcement agencies.
Linden, Marcus van Der, and Garcia, Magaley Rodriguez, eds. On Coerced Labor: Work and Compulsion after Slavery. Boston, MA and Leiden: Brill Academic Publishers, 2016.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
A collection of scholarly essays that examines coercive forms of post-Emancipation labor substitution that have persisted into our time.
Miers, Suzanne. Slavery in the 20th Century: The Evolution of a Global Problem. New York: Altamira Press, 2003.Google Scholar
Places modern slavery in comparative historical context while tracing the development of the international antislavery movement over the last hundred years.
Miller, Joseph C. The Problem of Slavery as History: A Global Approach. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 2012.Google Scholar
A challenging historical critique of conventional academic understandings of slavery in the past and today that proposes radically new approaches.
Murphy, Laura, ed. Survivors of Slavery: Modern Day Slave Narratives. New York: Columbia University Press, 2014.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
An accessible collection of first-hand testimony of slavery survivors from many walks of life.
Patterson, Orlando. Slavery and Social Death: A Comparative Study. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1982.Google Scholar
An influential historical analysis of enslavement that defines that condition as “social death.”
Quirk, Joel. The Antislavery Project: From the Slave Trade to Human Trafficking. Philadelphia, PA: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2011.Google Scholar
A comprehensive, substantial historical examination of the evolution of abolitionist movements in response to evolving manifestations of slavery.
Samarasinghe, Vidyamali. Female Sex Trafficking in Asia: The Resilience of Patriarchy in a Changing World. New York: Routledge, 2008.Google Scholar
A feminist, field-research-based exploration of sex trafficking in Nepal, Cambodia, and the Philippines, focusing on strategies for combatting such exploitation.
Shelley, Louise. Human Trafficking: A Global Perspective. Cambridge and New York: Cambridge University Press, 2013.Google Scholar
Presents a global picture of contemporary slavery while employing a historical approach that explains national and regional variations.
Skinner, E. Benjamin. A Crime So Monstrous: Face to Face with Modern Slavery. New York: Free Press, 2008.Google Scholar
A compelling personal account of a journalist’s encounters with contemporary slavery.
Wong, Kent, and Monroe, Julie. Sweatshop Slaves: Asian Americans and the Garment Industry. Los Angeles, CA: UCLA Center for Labor Research Education, 2006.Google Scholar
Focuses on Asian American workers in the garment industry, particularly in California, and the organizations that have worked to eradicate sweatshops.
Wright, Robert E. The Poverty of Slavery: How Unfree Labor Pollutes the Economy. New York: Palgrave MacMillan, 2017.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
An analysis of the stultifying consequences of enslavement, past and present, for growth and diversification in national economies.

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