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Section II - Hormones and Gestational Disorders

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  09 November 2022

Felice Petraglia
Affiliation:
Università degli Studi, Florence
Mariarosaria Di Tommaso
Affiliation:
Università degli Studi, Florence
Federico Mecacci
Affiliation:
Università degli Studi, Florence
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Hormones and Pregnancy
Basic Science and Clinical Implications
, pp. 73 - 198
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2022

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References

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