Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Hostname: page-component-77c89778f8-vpsfw Total loading time: 0 Render date: 2024-07-24T10:43:19.782Z Has data issue: false hasContentIssue false

Introduction

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  16 June 2023

Mark Henrickson
Affiliation:
Massey University, Auckland
Casey Charles
Affiliation:
University of Montana
Shiv Ganesh
Affiliation:
University of Texas, Austin
Sulaimon Giwa
Affiliation:
Memorial University of Newfoundland
Kan Diana Kwok
Affiliation:
The University of Hong Kong
Tetyana Semigina
Affiliation:
Academy of Labour, Social Relations and Tourism, Ukraine
Get access

Summary

This book would have been unimaginable 35 years ago.

And yet, here we are. That, perhaps, is the central, unifying theme to this volume: all kinds of people living with HIV are alive, growing older and seeking to live all of their lives, including their sexual selves.

The world has been distracted by a different pandemic over the last few years, and certainly the readily transmissible COVID-19 has presented a major threat to the world and the global health infrastructure. But COVID-19 is far more promiscuous than HIV/AIDS about people it infects, which means stigma against people living with the coronavirus has been very limited, and protests have been more against government regulation and interventions than people with the coronavirus. The global health community, while arguably not in a timely enough way, moved with remarkable speed for such bureaucratic organisations. With a few notable exceptions, government responses to COVID-19 have been unprecedentedly rapid and robust. These responses have been far different from government responses to AIDS in the earliest days, when AIDS was called ‘GRID’ (1982, Gay-Related Immune Deficiency) in the United States, and from the refusal for years of some governments to acknowledge HIV in their countries (Boone and Batsell, 2001; Chigwedere et al, 2008; King, 2021). UNAIDS (2021) estimates that nearly 38 million people were living with HIV in 2020; since the start of the epidemic in the late 1970s, 79.3 million have been infected with HIV and 36.3 million have died from AIDS-related illnesses. Most of those infected and affected by HIV were in already-stigmatised communities: people in poor countries, poor people in wealthy countries, people of colour, men who have sex with men, injection drug users and combinations of all of these. The intersecting diseases of virus, stigma, fear, racism and discrimination greatly impeded the development of care for people living with HIV. It is notable that, because of the tremendous research foundation laid in the search for HIV treatments and vaccines, vaccines for COVID-19 were produced with unprecedented speed (Zuckerman and McKay, 2020).

The editors and contributors to this book have decades of experience of living with HIV or working with people living with HIV.

Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Bristol University Press
Print publication year: 2022

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×