Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-768ffcd9cc-jpcp9 Total loading time: 0.236 Render date: 2022-12-01T21:48:29.696Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "useRatesEcommerce": false } hasContentIssue true
This chapter is part of a book that is no longer available to purchase from Cambridge Core

1 - Nineteenth-Century Philosophy of Religion: An Introduction

Douglas Hedley
Affiliation:
University of Cambridge
Chris Ryan
Affiliation:
University of Cambridge
Graham Oppy
Affiliation:
Monash University, Austrailia
Get access

Summary

The predominant position of nineteenth-century philosophy of religion was conciliatory. Its main figures set out to confront, absorb and pass beyond the radical Enlightenment's critical assault on Europe's religious and metaphysical tradition by developing philosophical syntheses that, to a great extent, assimilated the main lines and presuppositions of these critiques, while simultaneously preserving the most important features of Europe's religious inheritance. This spirit of conciliation is as evident in the metaphysical systems of mainstream German idealism at the opening of the century, as it is in the neo-Kantian inspired division between fact and value that dominated philosophy of religion at its close. In the long term, however, this synthesis turned out to be as fragile as it was subtle; although it managed to weather the stormy changes and extremes that buffeted it for the greater part of the century, its elements were eventually torn apart by the extreme intellectual and cultural conditions that emerged with the killing fields of the First World War.

THE RADICAL ENLIGHTENMENT: SPINOZA AND HUME

The Enlightenment inaugurated a fundamental upheaval in the European tradition of philosophical reflection on religion, for it was during this period that philosophers developed perspectives on the theological inheritance of the West, and methods of analysing its main themes, that dispensed with the assumptions and sources of the great works of late medieval scholasticism, such as the Disputationes Metaphysicae (Metaphysical disputations) of Francisco Suàrez (1548–1617) (see Vol. 3, Ch. 6).

Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Acumen Publishing
Print publication year: 2009

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×