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Part III - Realist Era

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  27 October 2017

Chris Raczkowski
Affiliation:
University of South Alabama
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Print publication year: 2017

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  • Realist Era
  • Edited by Chris Raczkowski, University of South Alabama
  • Book: A History of American Crime Fiction
  • Online publication: 27 October 2017
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  • Realist Era
  • Edited by Chris Raczkowski, University of South Alabama
  • Book: A History of American Crime Fiction
  • Online publication: 27 October 2017
Available formats
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To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

  • Realist Era
  • Edited by Chris Raczkowski, University of South Alabama
  • Book: A History of American Crime Fiction
  • Online publication: 27 October 2017
Available formats
×