Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-544b6db54f-fg2fv Total loading time: 0.305 Render date: 2021-10-16T13:33:50.913Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

8 - Occupational Structures, Employment, and Unemployment

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 June 2012

Laird W. Bergad
Affiliation:
City University of New York
Herbert S. Klein
Affiliation:
Stanford University, California
Get access

Summary

Occupational Structures

The occupational structure of the Latino workforce was fundamentally different from the other racial and ethnic groups in the United States in that Latinos were far less likely to occupy higher-status and salaried management and professional positions than non-Hispanic whites and blacks and Asians. This was closely connected to the surge in the migration of lesser-educated persons after 1980 and the resulting lower educational attainment levels found among Latinos. In 2005 only 16.7% of all Hispanics worked in these higher-income earning professions compared with 35.4% of employed non-Hispanic whites, 23.6% of non-Hispanic blacks, and 44% of Asians. Yet, nearly 46% of the Hispanic labor force was employed in service, sales, and office occupations, and this was not too different from the other racial/ethnic groups, each of which had over 40% of their respective employed populations working in these same professions.

A major divergence was found in construction trades where there was a higher concentration of Latinos. Slightly over 15% of employed Hispanics labored in construction-related occupations compared with 9.6% of non-Hispanic whites, 6.5% of non-Hispanic blacks, and 3.6% of Asians. When construction and production occupations are examined together, the contrasts with the other racial/ethnic groups are more extreme. Just over a third of all employed Latinos worked in these two categories compared with 21.5% of non-Hispanic whites, 23.5% of non-Hispanic blacks, and only 14.7% of Asians who were employed (see Graph 8.1).

Type
Chapter
Information
Hispanics in the United States
A Demographic, Social, and Economic History, 1980–2005
, pp. 276 - 319
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2010

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Borjas, George J.Assimilation, Changes in Cohort Quality, and the Earnings of ImmigrantsJournal of Labor Economics 3 1985 463CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Butcher, Kristin F.DiNardo, JohnThe Immigrant and Native-Born Wage Distributions: Evidence from United States CensusesIndustrial and Labor Relations Review 56 2002 97CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Borjas, George J.Long-Run Convergence of Ethnic Skill Differentials: The Children and Grandchildren of the Great MigrationIndustrial and Labor Relations Review 47 1994 553CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Perlmann, JoelWaldinger, RogerSecond Generation Decline? Children of Immigrants, Past and Present – A ReconsiderationInternational Migration Review 31 1997 893CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Card, DavidDiNardo, JohnEstes, EugenaThe More Things Change: Immigrants and the Children of Immigrants in the 1940s, the 1970s, and the 1990sBorjas, George J.Issues in the Economics of ImmigrationChicagoUniversity of Chicago Press 2000 227Google Scholar

Send book to Kindle

To send this book to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Send book to Dropbox

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×