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Introduction

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 February 2010

David Loewenstein
Affiliation:
Marjorie and Lorin Tiefenthaler Professor of English, University of Wisconsin-Madison
John Marshall
Affiliation:
Professor of History, Johns Hopkins University
David Loewenstein
Affiliation:
University of Wisconsin, Madison
John Marshall
Affiliation:
The Johns Hopkins University
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Summary

In 1694 the Quaker Benjamin Furly declared in a letter to John Locke that the word “heretic” was one of “the most pernicious words that have for 1000 years obtaind amongst mankind,” as it was used to “render odious … all honest … generous spirited men, that dare be so bold as to profess, and practise what they Judge to be their duty … how contrary … it be to … church slaves and all their enslaved followers, who would make free men … bow their necks to their doctrines, decrees, orders, injunctions, and constitutions.” For Furly, “The Bugbear of authority, Tradition, and the name of the Church is so sacred … That few people dare call in question the Doctrines which the holy church has taught for so many hundred years, or which their Learned and godly ministers have all along taught since the Reformation.” Furly called for people instead to examine theological doctrines for themselves with eyes which “should be opened to see,” declaring that the Reformation had thrown off “the Intollerable yoake of Romish slavery” because the “first reformers” had been willing to be “counted Hereticks” and had made “no bones of Trampling all under foot … [doctrines] which they found to be unreasonable and unscripturall.”

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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2006

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  • Introduction
    • By David Loewenstein, Marjorie and Lorin Tiefenthaler Professor of English, University of Wisconsin-Madison, John Marshall, Professor of History, Johns Hopkins University
  • Edited by David Loewenstein, University of Wisconsin, Madison, John Marshall, The Johns Hopkins University
  • Book: Heresy, Literature and Politics in Early Modern English Culture
  • Online publication: 20 February 2010
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511627507.001
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  • Introduction
    • By David Loewenstein, Marjorie and Lorin Tiefenthaler Professor of English, University of Wisconsin-Madison, John Marshall, Professor of History, Johns Hopkins University
  • Edited by David Loewenstein, University of Wisconsin, Madison, John Marshall, The Johns Hopkins University
  • Book: Heresy, Literature and Politics in Early Modern English Culture
  • Online publication: 20 February 2010
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511627507.001
Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

  • Introduction
    • By David Loewenstein, Marjorie and Lorin Tiefenthaler Professor of English, University of Wisconsin-Madison, John Marshall, Professor of History, Johns Hopkins University
  • Edited by David Loewenstein, University of Wisconsin, Madison, John Marshall, The Johns Hopkins University
  • Book: Heresy, Literature and Politics in Early Modern English Culture
  • Online publication: 20 February 2010
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511627507.001
Available formats
×