Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-99c86f546-vl2kb Total loading time: 0.24 Render date: 2021-11-28T06:38:51.348Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }
This chapter is part of a book that is no longer available to purchase from Cambridge Core

5 - Dialectic as logic of transformative processes

Angelica Nuzzo
Affiliation:
City University of New York
Katerina Deligiorgi
Affiliation:
University of Sussex
Get access

Summary

Unlike other parts of Hegel's philosophical system, the Logic raises for the interpreter not only detailed questions concerning particular arguments and the stages of its construction but also the more general, indeed preliminary problem regarding the subject as well as the overall aim and ambition of its project. Ultimately, this problem challenges the status of the Logic as “logic”. For, it is certainly legitimate to ask whether Hegel's dialectic is really “logic” in the sense understood in the tradition preceding and following Hegel; or to ask what kind of logic dialectic is. This question has been raised time and again. Attempts to answer it include claims that Hegel's logic is an ontology that either returns to pre-Kantian metaphysics or offers a renewal of metaphysics after Kant's critique; that it provides an epistemological theory intended to guide the development of all other philosophical disciplines; that it amounts to speculative mystification of autarchic thinking, or that it is a theory of meaning or a theory regarding the pragmatic institution of norms. These and analogous accounts generally stress one single aspect of Hegel's logical project leaving out the more complex constellation of reasons that he provides as justification of its overarching task. It follows that, whatever their respective merits, the explanatory potential of these readings is limited to the consequences of one single thesis: ontology versus epistemology versus theory of meaning and so forth. On all these accounts, much is left unconsidered. And the central question still remains open.

Type
Chapter
Information
Hegel
New Directions
, pp. 85 - 104
Publisher: Acumen Publishing
Print publication year: 2006

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Send book to Kindle

To send this book to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Send book to Dropbox

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×