Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-dc8c957cd-cpb9g Total loading time: 0.2 Render date: 2022-01-28T13:12:15.605Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

4 - The lyric

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  06 December 2010

Get access

Summary

It is in literature that Hegel finds the most promise for the post-romantic arts, and it is in Germany in particular that the “practical rules” and neo-classical strictures of eighteenth-century aesthetic theory have been “violently cast aside … owing to the appearance of genuinely living [lebendige] poetry” (LFA 20, xiii:37). Nor is the choice parochial: if it comes to naming the minor golden ages of modernity, surely the German literature of the age of Goethe stands with the American Renaissance of the 1830s–60s, the Russian literature of the 1830s–90s, and the transatlantic modernism of the 1890s–1940s. The short story was essentially invented by Tieck, Kleist, and Hoffmann. Drama saw the arrival of Faust and Schiller's tragedies. Meanwhile, leaving The Sorrows of Young Werther aside, a new tradition in the novel is founded in Wilhelm Meister. Strikingly, none of these works seems to Hegel to point a way forward; it is the lyric, instead, that draws his attention. Even here his choices appear eccentric, however. The most influential tradition is that of the Romantic lyric that Goethe essentially invents in early poems like “Maifest,” “Es schlug mir das Herz,” and the second “Wandrers Nachtlied”; also important is the output of Schiller's and Goethe's Balladenjahr of 1797–8, contemporaneous with Wordsworth's and Coleridge's. While Hegel admires these works, as he does Robbers and Faust, he tends to view them as one-off projects limited by the poets' temperaments – here, Goethe's inwardness and Schiller's intellectualism.

Type
Chapter
Information
Hegel on the Modern Arts , pp. 170 - 211
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2010

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Lamport, F.J. in German Classical Drama (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1990), 15, 31Google Scholar

Send book to Kindle

To send this book to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

  • The lyric
  • Benjamin Rutter
  • Book: Hegel on the Modern Arts
  • Online publication: 06 December 2010
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511760440.005
Available formats
×

Send book to Dropbox

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

  • The lyric
  • Benjamin Rutter
  • Book: Hegel on the Modern Arts
  • Online publication: 06 December 2010
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511760440.005
Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

  • The lyric
  • Benjamin Rutter
  • Book: Hegel on the Modern Arts
  • Online publication: 06 December 2010
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511760440.005
Available formats
×