Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-8bbf57454-5qtdt Total loading time: 0.701 Render date: 2022-01-23T19:59:51.430Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Chapter 16 - Evidence-Based Reading Interventions

Implementation Issues for the Twenty-First Century

from Part IV - Successful Implementation of Specific Programmes and Interventions:

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 November 2012

Barbara Kelly
Affiliation:
University of Strathclyde
Daniel F. Perkins
Affiliation:
Pennsylvania State University
Get access

Summary

This chapter explores issues in implementation of reading interventions faced by the next generation of researchers and practitioners. It forms part of a major text on implementation science. The chapter analyzes recent work on 'implementation quality' of research undertaken in classrooms exemplification with reference to recent research on the use of literacy technology. It talks about issues concerning the scalability and sustainability of implementations. There is every likelihood that major changes to educational practice and indeed to the whole organisation of school boards might be associated with effective change in intervention research. The chapter uses current research on the ABRACADABRA (ABRA) reading program to highlight some general themes about implementation science. The first is that emerging evidence-based approaches need to bridge the gap between efficacy studies and effectiveness studies. A second theme is that one needs to explore action in the classroom to understand implementation.
Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2012

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)
1
Cited by

Send book to Kindle

To send this book to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Send book to Dropbox

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×