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15 - Hypothesis of Maximum Friction Factor

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  24 November 2022

Vijay P. Singh
Affiliation:
Texas A & M University
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Summary

The hypothesis of maximum friction factor states that the channel geometry evolves to a stable nonplanar shape when the friction factor reaches a local maximum. It is supported by published data on bed forms, channels with artificial roughness elements, meandering channels, and bed armoring. This hypothesis can be regarded as an extremal hypothesis. However, this hypothesis may not be invariably true.

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Chapter
Information
Handbook of Hydraulic Geometry
Theories and Advances
, pp. 407 - 418
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2022

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References

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