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7 - Hydrodynamic Theory

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  24 November 2022

Vijay P. Singh
Affiliation:
Texas A & M University
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Summary

Several hydrodynamic theories have been employed for deriving downstream hydraulic geometry relations of width, depth, velocity, and slope in terms of flow discharge. Five theories, the Smith theory, the Julien-Wargadalam (JW) theory, the Parker theory, the Griffiths theory, and the Ackers theory, are discussed in this chapter. These theories employ different forms of the continuity equation, friction equation, and transport equations. The Smith hydrodynamic theory also uses a morphological relation, whereas the JW theory uses an angle between transversal and downstream shear stress components, and the Parker theory uses a depth function.

Type
Chapter
Information
Handbook of Hydraulic Geometry
Theories and Advances
, pp. 210 - 244
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2022

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  • Hydrodynamic Theory
  • Vijay P. Singh, Texas A & M University
  • Book: Handbook of Hydraulic Geometry
  • Online publication: 24 November 2022
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781009222136.008
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  • Hydrodynamic Theory
  • Vijay P. Singh, Texas A & M University
  • Book: Handbook of Hydraulic Geometry
  • Online publication: 24 November 2022
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781009222136.008
Available formats
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Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

  • Hydrodynamic Theory
  • Vijay P. Singh, Texas A & M University
  • Book: Handbook of Hydraulic Geometry
  • Online publication: 24 November 2022
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781009222136.008
Available formats
×