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Preface to the Third Edition

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 December 2010

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Summary

The five years since the second edition of this book appeared have witnessed economic and technological changes in scholarly publishing and in the academic world. The nation's economic recovery has not been reflected in the budgets of colleges and universities. The anticipated improvement in the market for Ph.D.'s has not occurred, and academic jobs remain scarce. Library book budgets have shrunk, reducing the sales of scholarly publishers. University press budgets have suffered along with those of academic departments, and presses are more than ever tightening their belts and seeking new markets. There are some brighter spots, however. Personal computers have made it easier for authors to prepare manuscripts and cheaper for publishers to manufacture them. Electronic networks and CD-ROM technology have created new products and more efficient distribution methods. The technology is young, and neither publishers nor authors are entirely comfortable with it, but it is promising. For example, although university presses are not putting their books online, you will find their catalogs on the Internet.

For the academic author, these changes mean that publication is more important than ever, more difficult than it has been, and likely to take new forms. In this edition, I have tried to help authors adjust to this new climate by providing current information on both the state of new technologies and their meaning to authors. I have revised Chapter 12 [11 in this edition] to reflect the changing costs associated with reduced print runs.

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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2009

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