Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-5d6d958fb5-ls6xp Total loading time: 0.954 Render date: 2022-11-29T19:31:54.344Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "displayNetworkTab": true, "displayNetworkMapGraph": false, "useSa": true } hasContentIssue true

9 - Clarifying the Character of Habits

Understanding What and How They Explain

from Part II - The Enactment of Habits in Mind and World

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  24 November 2020

Fausto Caruana
Affiliation:
Institute of Neuroscience (Parma), Italian National Research Council
Italo Testa
Affiliation:
Università degli Studi, Parma
Get access

Summary

This chapter aims to set the record straight about a special sort of intelligence exhibited by habitual doings. It defends an enactivist account of habitual doings which, at its core, depicts habits as flexible and adjustable modes of response that are world directed and context sensitive. So understood, habits are wholly unlike the exercise of blind mechanisms or mindless reflexes. Nevertheless, we resist the familiar forced choice of thereby understanding habits in standard cognitivist terms. Our proposal aims to avoid the twin mistakes of either underintellectualizing or overintellectualizing habits. In tune with our enactivist elucidation of the core character of habits, the chapter also explicates how habits, so conceived, can support and thwart our larger projects.

Type
Chapter
Information
Habits
Pragmatist Approaches from Cognitive Science, Neuroscience, and Social Theory
, pp. 204 - 222
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2020

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Anscombe, Gertrude Elizabeth Margarete. 1957/2000. Intention. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.Google Scholar
Bratman, M. (1987). Intention, Plans, and Practical Reason (vol. 10). Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.Google Scholar
Brett, N. 1981. “Human Habits.” Canadian Journal of Philosophy 11: 35776.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Carlisle, Claire. 2006. “Becoming and Unbecoming: The Theory and Practice of Anatta.” Contemporary Buddhism 7 (1): 7589.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Carlisle, Claire. 2013. “The Question of Habit in Theology and Philosophy: From Hexis to Plasticity.” Body & Society 19 (2–3): 3057.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Carlisle, Claire. 2014. On Habit. London: Routledge.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Clarke, Randolph. 2010. “Skilled Activity and the Causal Theory of Action.” Philosophy and Phenomenological Research LXXX (3): 527.Google Scholar
Davidson, D. (1963). “Actions, Reasons, and Causes.” The Journal of Philosophy 60 (23): 685700.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Davidson, D. (1967). “Causal Relations.” The Journal of Philosophy 64 (21): 691703.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Davidson, D. (1973). “Radical Interpretation.” Dialectica 27 (3–4): 31328.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Dewey, John. 1983. “Human Nature and Conduct.” In The Middle Works of John Dewey, 1925–1953, vol. 14: 1922, Human Nature and Conduct. Edited by Boydston, Jo Ann, 1437. Carbondale, IL: Southern Illinois University Press.Google Scholar
Di Paolo, Ezequiel A., Buhrmann, Thomas, and Barandiaran, Xabier E.. 2017. Sensorimotor Life: An Enactive Proposal. Oxford: Oxford University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Douskos, Christos. 2017a. “Habit and Intention.” Philosophia 45: 112948. doi: 10.1007/s11406-016-9810-z.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Douskos, Christos. 2017b. “Deliberation and Automaticity in Habitual Acts.” Ethics in Progress 1: 1520.Google Scholar
Douskos, Christos (2018). “Deliberation and Automaticity in Habitual Acts.” Ethics in Progress 9(1): 2543.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Egbert, Matthew D., and Barandiaran, Xabier E.. 2014. “Modeling Habits as Self-Sustaining Patterns of Sensorimotor Behavior.” Frontiers in Human Neuroscience. doi: 10.3389/fnhum.2014.00590.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Enç, B. (2003) How we Act: Causes, Reasons, and Intentions. Oxford: Oxford University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Fuchs, Thomas. 2017. Ecology of the Brain: The Phenomenology and Biology of the Embodied Mind. Oxford: Oxford University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Gallagher, Shaun. 2017. Enactivist Interventions. Rethinking the Mind. Oxford: Oxford University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Garson, Justin, and Papineau, David. 2019. “Teleosemantics, Selection and Novel Contents.” Biology and Philosophy 34: 36. doi: 10.1007/s10539-019-9689-8.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Heras-Escribano, Manuel. 2019. The Philosophy of Affordances. Cham: Palgrave Macmillan.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hutto, Daniel D., and Myin, Erik. 2013. Radicalizing Enactivism: Basic Minds without Content. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.Google Scholar
Hutto, Daniel D., and Myin, Erik. 2017. Evolving Enactivism: Basic Minds Meet Content. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hutto, Daniel D., and Satne, Glenda 2015. “The Natural Origins of Content.” Philosophia, 43 (3): 52136.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
James, William. 1890. The Principles of Psychology (vols 1–2). New York: Henry Holt.Google Scholar
Kalis, Annemarie, and Ometto, Dawa. 2019. “An Anscombean Perspective on Habitual Action.” Topoi. doi: 10.1007/s11245-019-09651-8.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Locke, John. 1990. Second Treatise on Civil Government. 1690. Indianapolis, IN: Hackett.Google Scholar
McGuirk, James N. 2016. “Metaphysical and Phenomenological Perspectives on Habituality and the Naturalization of the Mind.” In Analytic and Continental Philosophy: Methods and Perspectives. Proceedings of the 37th International Wittgenstein Symposium (vol. 23, p. 203). Berlin: Walter de Gruyter.Google Scholar
Mele, A. R. (1992). Irrationality: An Essay on Akrasia, Self-Deception, and Self-Control. Oxford: Oxford University Press on Demand.Google Scholar
Millikan, Ruth Garrett. 1984. Language, Thought and Other Biological Categories. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.Google Scholar
Moran, Richard. 2004/2017. “Anscombe on Practical Knowledge.” In Agency and Action. Edited by Hyman, John and Steward, Helen. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement. 55. Reprinted in Richard Moran (2017). The Philosophical Imagination. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Noë, A. 2009. Out of our Heads: Why You Are Not Your Brain, and Other Lessons from the Biology of Consciousness. New York: Hill and Wang.Google Scholar
Owens, David. 2017. “Habitual Agency.” Philosophical Explorations 20 (suppl. 2): 93108.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Pollard, Bill. 2006. “Explaining Actions with Habits.” American Philosophical Quarterly 43 (1): 5769.Google Scholar
Ryle, G. (1949/2009). The Concept of Mind. New York: Routledge.Google Scholar
Shea, Nicholas. 2015. “Distinguishing Top-Down from Bottom-Up Effects.” In Perception and Its Modalities. Edited by Biggs, Stephen, Matthen, Mohan, and Stokes, Dustin, 79 Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Silver, Kenneth. 2019. “Habitual Weakness.” Thought. doi: 10.1002/tht3.431.Google Scholar
Small, W. 2020. “Practical Knowledge and Habits of Mind.” In Journal of Philosophy of Education 54 (2): 37797.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Stanley, Jason. 2015. “Knowledge, Habit, Practice, Skill.” Journal of Philosophical Research 40: 31523.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Vandaele, Yound, and Janak, Patricia H.. 2018. “Defining the Place of Habit in Substance Use Disorders.” Progress in Neuro-Psychopharmacology and Biological Psychiatry 87: 2232.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
4
Cited by

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×