Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-7ccbd9845f-z5z76 Total loading time: 0.513 Render date: 2023-01-30T13:03:35.108Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "useRatesEcommerce": false } hasContentIssue true

Chapter 6 - Writing about Methods

from Part II - Parts of Articles

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  19 November 2018

Robert J. Sternberg
Affiliation:
Cornell University, New York
Get access
Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2018

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Cook, T. D., & Campbell, D. T. (1979). Quasi-experimentation: Design and analysis issues for field settings. Boston: Houghton-Mifflin.Google Scholar
Crano, W. D., & Brewer, M. B. (1973). Principles of research in social psychology. New York: McGraw-Hill.Google Scholar
Greenwald, A. G. (2012). There is nothing so theoretical as a good method. Perspectives on Psychological Science, 7, 99108.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Moher, D., Altman, D. G., & Schulz, K. F. (2010). CONSORT 2010 statement: Updated guidelines for reporting parallel group randomised trials. BMC Medicine, 8, 18.Google Scholar
Poldrack, R. A., Fletcher, P. C., Henson, R. N., Worsley, K. J., Brett, M., & Nichols, T. E. (2008). Guidelines for reporting an fMRI study. Neuroimage, 40, 409441.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Reis, H. T., Gable, S. L., & Maniaci, M. R. (2014). Methods for studying everyday experience in its natural context. In Reis, H. T. & Judd, C. M. (Eds.), Handbook of research methods in social and personality psychology (2nd edn., pp. 373403). New York: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Sternberg, R. J., & Gordeeva, T. (1996). What makes an article influential? Psychological Science, 7, 6975.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
West, S. G., Cham, H., & Liu, Y. (2014). Causal inference and generalization in field settings: Experimental and quasi-experimental designs. In Reis, H. T. &Judd, C. M. (Eds.), Handbook of research methods in social and personality psychology (2nd edn., pp. 4980). New York: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×