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Preface

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 August 2009

Pankaj S. Joshi
Affiliation:
Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai, India
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Summary

The physical phenomena in astrophysics and cosmology involve gravitational collapse in a fundamental way. The final fate of a massive star, when it collapses under its own gravity at the end of its life cycle, is one of the most important questions in gravitation theory and relativistic astrophysics today. The applications and basic theory of blackholes vigorously developed over the past decades crucially depend on this outcome.

A sufficiently massive star many times the size of the Sun would undergo a continual gravitational collapse on exhausting its nuclear fuel, without achieving an equilibrium state such as a neutron star or white dwarf. The singularity theorems in general relativity then predict that the collapse gives rise to a spacetime singularity, either hidden within an event horizon of gravity or visible to the external universe. The densities and spacetime curvatures get arbitrarily high and diverge at these ultra-strong gravity regions. Their visibility to outside observers is determined by the causal structure within the dynamically developing collapsing cloud, as governed by the Einstein field equations. When the internal dynamics of the collapse delays the horizon formation, these become visible, and may communicate physical effects to the external universe. These issues are investigated here, and the treatment is aimed at showing how such visible ultra-dense regions arise naturally and generically as the outcome of a dynamical gravitational collapse in Einstein gravity.

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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2007

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  • Preface
  • Pankaj S. Joshi, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai, India
  • Book: Gravitational Collapse and Spacetime Singularities
  • Online publication: 15 August 2009
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511536274.001
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  • Preface
  • Pankaj S. Joshi, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai, India
  • Book: Gravitational Collapse and Spacetime Singularities
  • Online publication: 15 August 2009
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511536274.001
Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

  • Preface
  • Pankaj S. Joshi, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai, India
  • Book: Gravitational Collapse and Spacetime Singularities
  • Online publication: 15 August 2009
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511536274.001
Available formats
×