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1901

from The Letters

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  23 August 2019

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Summary

Bantock's Helena: Orchestral Variations on the theme H.F.B. was finally published by Breitkopf & Härtel, and plans began to get Holbrooke appointed on the staff of the Birmingham and Midland Institute. Difficulties in the Bantock–Wallace relationship led to the temporary breakdown of their friendship. There was the premiere of Wallace's ‘Symphonic Poem no. 4’ (subsequently titled Greeting to the New Century) on 27 March, and he also published his songs ‘Entreaties’ and ‘Fame’ with Enoch & Sons, and his song cycles Lords of the Sea (Boosey) and the Jacobite Songs (Ricordi) – all of which were settings of his own texts. Newman's articles in the Contemporary Review and The Speaker are referred to by Bantock below.

105 GRANVILLE BANTOCK TO ERNEST NEWMAN

BIRMINGHAM AND MIDLAND INSTITUTE.

SCHOOL OF MUSIC.

PARADISE STREET,

BIRMINGHAM,

April 2nd 1901

My dear Newman

Right glad was I to hear from you again, although I own myself this time the culprit. But Influenza has laid us low, and we are only now gradually recovering. The Examinations at the School have kept me occupied whenever I had a minute to turn round, for a complete Syllabus had to be drawn up and issued by your ‘umble. At the present moment I have forty weary candidates facing me, and struggling with a simple Rudiments paper. However, your letter is the subject of my mind just now. You appear in a rumbolofic despondent state, over the state of musical articles & critics V Editors; has Holbrooke been writing to you lately? – Yet I have actually dared to send the Fortnightly an article on “Realism in Music”, wherein I have attacked a foot-note from your “Gluck”. But the subject needed careful investigation, and since Wallace has turned traitor, why, I must be myself. His Symphonic Poem (No 4) performed by the London Philharmonic, was a pure piece of cowardice. Wallace could not write abstract music, & yet he puts forward programme-music, for such it is – vide papers – without even the title. Therein he hangs himself. Well, let him. I intend more than ever to advocate realistic music. It sounds better than programme music. Music must evolve, and we must go back to Liszt's work for our stepping stones.

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Publisher: Boydell & Brewer
Print publication year: 2017

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  • 1901
  • Edited by Michael Allis
  • Book: Granville Bantock's Letters to William Wallace and Ernest Newman, 1893–1921
  • Online publication: 23 August 2019
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781787441569.010
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  • 1901
  • Edited by Michael Allis
  • Book: Granville Bantock's Letters to William Wallace and Ernest Newman, 1893–1921
  • Online publication: 23 August 2019
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781787441569.010
Available formats
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Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

  • 1901
  • Edited by Michael Allis
  • Book: Granville Bantock's Letters to William Wallace and Ernest Newman, 1893–1921
  • Online publication: 23 August 2019
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781787441569.010
Available formats
×