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Part I - Foundations

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  12 August 2019

Holger Diessel
Affiliation:
Friedrich-Schiller-Universität, Jena, Germany
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Summary

Chapter 2 provides a background on the use of network models in different scientific disciplines and introduces the general architecture of the grammar network. The proposed network model has two levels of analysis: a lower level, at which linguistic signs, notably constructions, are defined by three different types of associations, or relations: (1) symbolic relations connecting form and meaning, (2) sequential relations connecting linguistic elements in sequence and (3) taxonomic relations connecting linguistic patterns at different levels of abstraction. Together the three relations define the basic units of speech, i.e., lexemes and constructions. Every unit constitutes a (local) network shaped by language use, but these networks also serve as nodes of a higher-level network that involves three other types of relations: (4) lexical relations connecting lexemes with similar or contrastive forms and meanings, (5) constructional relations connecting constructions at the same level of abstraction and (6) and filler-slot relations connecting particular lexemes with constructional schemas.

Type
Chapter
Information
The Grammar Network
How Linguistic Structure Is Shaped by Language Use
, pp. 7 - 40
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2019

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  • Foundations
  • Holger Diessel, Friedrich-Schiller-Universität, Jena, Germany
  • Book: The Grammar Network
  • Online publication: 12 August 2019
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  • Foundations
  • Holger Diessel, Friedrich-Schiller-Universität, Jena, Germany
  • Book: The Grammar Network
  • Online publication: 12 August 2019
Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

  • Foundations
  • Holger Diessel, Friedrich-Schiller-Universität, Jena, Germany
  • Book: The Grammar Network
  • Online publication: 12 August 2019
Available formats
×