Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-99c86f546-7mfl8 Total loading time: 0.38 Render date: 2021-12-01T19:46:56.086Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

10 - Oocyte donation

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  22 October 2009

Paul Serhal
Affiliation:
Assisted Conception Unit, UCLH, London, UK
Paul Serhal
Affiliation:
The University College London Hospitals
Caroline Overton
Affiliation:
Bristol Royal Infirmary
Get access

Summary

To women traditionally considered irreversibly sterile due to ovarian failure, oocyte donation and exogenous steroid replacement to create an endometrial milieu receptive to embryonic implantation offers the prospect of achieving a successful pregnancy. Irrespective of the age of the oocyte recipient, it is possible to achieve a high fertility potential with a low miscarriage rate, reflecting the improved biological performance of oocytes obtained from young donors. It is now feasible to dissociate the stages of embryonic development and endometrial maturation in oocyte recipients. Hence, oocyte donation can provide insights into as yet unresolved questions, such as the duration of the ‘implantation window’ in humans. In human reproduction, oocyte donation undoubtedly complements basic IVF in elucidating the biological interactions between the conceptus, endometrium and steroid environment.

In 1983, Trounson et al. reported the first successful transfer of an in vitro fertilized donated oocyte embryo to a menstrually cyclic recipient using luteinizing hormone (LH) synchronization between the donor and the recipient to time the transfer. In 1984, Lutjen et al. reported the first successful pregnancy in a primary ovarian failure patient, following a sequential steroid replacement regimen and transfer of in vitro fertilized donated oocyte embryos. In 1983, Buster et al. reported the successful transfer of an in vivo fertilized donated ovum. In 1986, Serhal and Craft introduced the notion that women older than 40 years who have already entered the menopause might extend their reproductive potential through oocyte donation. Oocyte donation is a well-established technique and a large proportion of IVF units now run oocyte donation programs.

Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2004

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Send book to Kindle

To send this book to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Send book to Dropbox

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×